Vanier’s Dangerous “Lac” Lafontaine, 1954

In 1954, the apartment developments along Blake Boulevard were quite new. Land in what was then known as Eastview was available for a song and builders like Sam Blake (for whom the street was named) and Marius Vachon were all too happy take advantage of the opportunity. Although the municipality’s red hot real estate market after the Second World War rendered the humiliation of being put under provincial management during the Depression a distant memory, its effect on Eastview’s infrastructure remained. This is aside from the fact that paved streets and storm sewer systems were still considered to be, in most municipalities, an optional “nice to have” in new developments, and could wait.

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A Dog By Any Other Name (Season 6)

Although the writers were clearly beginning to run out of steam (at least, arguably), the sixth season of the Littlest Hobo was not intended to be the last.1Matthew Fraser. “Canadian shows on CTV agenda,” The Globe and Mail, May 22, 1985, S5. Mulroney-era changes in subsidization policy, financial troubles at CTV, changing tastes, and the unfortunate decision to use Hobo to fill Cancon quotas ensured that it would nevertheless be so.2Hobo almost seems to have been the only show used for this purpose as it seems to have become a byword for “Cancon policy filler programming” in reports on the policy. See Jeffrey Simpson, “A dramatic void,” The Globe and Mail, September 12, 1986, A6; John Haslett Cuff, “New Canadian content rules could reduce TV ad revenues,” The Globe and Mail, September 24, 1986, C5.

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Notes   [ + ]

1. Matthew Fraser. “Canadian shows on CTV agenda,” The Globe and Mail, May 22, 1985, S5.
2. Hobo almost seems to have been the only show used for this purpose as it seems to have become a byword for “Cancon policy filler programming” in reports on the policy. See Jeffrey Simpson, “A dramatic void,” The Globe and Mail, September 12, 1986, A6; John Haslett Cuff, “New Canadian content rules could reduce TV ad revenues,” The Globe and Mail, September 24, 1986, C5.

A Dog By Any Other Name (Season 5)

I chose it because Glen Eagles Motel seems to have contained a Timmins pennant. The Glen Eagles burnt down in 1990. The site at Twyn Rivers / Sheppard is now a “vista”.

The fifth season is about where I begin to remember (in my dullest possible memories) seeing Littlest Hobo episodes as they aired. Granted, when the season was going, I was approaching two years, but I also know that MCTV aired Hobo reruns frequently.

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