“A Touch of Scandinavia at the top of Range Road”: The Sandringham Apartments, Ottawa

The Sandringham Apartments on Range Road in Sandy Hill. Image: C.Ryan, February 2014.

The Sandringham Apartments, located at the far eastern edge of Sandy Hill on what was once known as Regan’s Hill,1”‘Regan’s Hill’ Received It’s Name From Henry Regan and His Sons 185[?],” Ottawa Citizen, March 31, 1928, 16. has been overlooking Strathcona Park since its completion in 1958. Its developers, Range Road Developments pulled out all the stops and hired Peter Dickinson, then of Page and Steele, to design an apartment aimed at the luxury market.2For a great tour of Dickinson’s work in Ottawa, see Robert Smythe’s “Peter Dickinson in Ottawa,” (2009).

Exit Stage West for the Strathcona Isolation Hospital

I have yet to find an image of the Strathcona Hospital from its Range Road / Templeton entrance. Until I do, enjoy this colourized version found on a post card from Strathcona Park. Image: pastottawa.com.

In May 1950, the Citizen reported that the Strathcona Isolation Hospital on Range Road at Templeton that overlooked Strathcona Park was going to be sold. The facility had generally been under-used, and it was well-known that the almost fifty year old facility could not be brought up to modern fireproofing standards.3Greg Connelley. “Strathcona Isolation Hospital To Be Sold,” Ottawa Citizen, May 10, 1950, 1, 20. The announcement did not come as a surprise: calls for a new isolation hospital to replace the almost fifty-year-old facility had been made since at least 1945, when it was placed under the control of the Civic Hospital.4”Modern Hospital For City Urged,” Ottawa Citizen, March 29, 1945, 12; “New Ottawa Hospital For Communicable Diseases Proposed,” Ottawa Journal, March 29, 1945, 12; “Report Strathcona To Be Controlled By Civic Hospital,” Ottawa Citizen, August 14, 1945, 11; “Object to Poles in Ottawa East,” Ottawa Citizen, September 18, 1945, 3; “Dr. Allan Doane Will Succeed Dr. W. T. Shirreff,” Ottawa Citizen, February 12, 1946, 12; “Strathcona Hospital Alterations Planned,” Ottawa Citizen, August 7, 1946, 6; “Require $50,000 To Modernize Strathona Hosp.,” Ottawa Journal, September 10, 1946, 14. 

It is a very desirable property and I understand that some real estate agents have already made enquiries… The property is on high ground with a good view and I don’t believe there would be any difficulty in selling it.

Acting Mayor L.L. Coulter, as quoted in Connelley, Ottawa Citizen, May 10, 1950, 20.

Of course, sale of the lot was also an attractive proposition: a hot real estate market and the City facing a $500,000 debenture issue for the new Isolation unit at the Civic lead to quick conclusions.5Not entirely different from the future sale of the current Main Branch of the Ottawa Public Library to defray costs of its replacement at Lebreton. Also see Ibid, Connelley. Acting Ottawa Mayor and Controller Len Coulter didn’t stop at idle speculation and rather engaged in what had long been an established civic pastime: speculating on ways that funds from the federal treasury could perhaps be transferred to the municipal treasury. In Coulter’s case, he mused openly about a luxury apartment hotel on the site that would accommodate members of Parliament and suggested that the Federal District Commission “name a price”.6”Coulter Would Use Strathcona Hospital As Home for MPs,” Ottawa Journal, May 11, 1950, 1.

While Coulter ran around Ottawa digging his elbows into the ribs of officialdom and otherwise trying to gin up interest in the Strathcona property, the wheels of civic borrowing continued to turn. By the following Monday, above some vocal opposition, Council approved the $500,000 debenture bylaw to construct the new Isolation unit. Those opposed to the new build felt that Strathcona Hospital could be adequately modernized at half the price.7”$500,000 Debenture Carries To Build an Isolation Unit,” Ottawa Journal, May 16, 1950, 9.

The new Isolation unit faced other – external – opposition as well. The Ottawa Property Owners’ Association, a group founded in 1924 with the express intent of keeping municipal debt down8”Department of Civic Affairs: Dedicated Chiefly of Ottawa’s Municipal Associations: Property Owners’ Association,” Ottawa Citizen, March 1, 1924, 4.,  had originally objected to the new construction and expressed its intention to appeal the debenture issue to the Ontario Municipal Board. The Association’s objection was only dropped when informed that the City may qualify for a substantial federal grant to construct the new wing.9”Objection Dropped,” Ottawa Citizen, July 3, 1950, 16.

To some degree the more hawkish Controllers and Councillors and civic groups like the Property Owners were right to be concerned. Cost of the new Civic pavilion had increased from the original $500,000 to $660,000, and finally to $820,000. Mayor Grenville Goodwin and Controller Charlotte Whitton, who were away at a conference in London (Ontario), advised the remainder of the Board of Control to go ahead and pass it. By then it was far too late to change courses. The Civic Hospital Trustees suggested that Strathcona could be kept open, but if that was the decision, they wanted it to be placed back under the control of the Ottawa Board of Health. With the Board of Control’s assent, the issue was sent to full council. 10”Debentures Approved,” Ottawa Citizen, June 13, 1951, 20; “Extra $160,000 Debenture For Hospital,” Ottawa Journal, June 13, 1951, 1.

With the issue of the Civic Hospital’s new pavilion in hand and construction underway, Council’s eye eventually turned to what to do with the Strathcona site. Whatever it would be, there was plenty of time to arrive at a decision, as Strathcona could not be mothballed until the new pavilion was complete. In order for the site to command a higher price (and continue to generate revenues into the future), Council – in agreement with the Board of Control – resolved to either sell the land and building to a business producing tax revenues, or to keep it. It would not sell the property to a religious or other tax-exempt institution.11”Hospital Site To Be Tax Producer,” Ottawa Journal, May 20, 1952, 3.

So sale it was. Controller Len Coulter took the opportunity to offer up his vision for an apartment-hotel that would cater to MPs and Senators, suggesting that the City had been approached for just such a purpose. Coulter continued, noting that since the old hospital was not entirely fireproof, it was a good candidate for demolition.12”May Sell Hospital: Private Interests Seek Strathcona,” Ottawa Citizen, July 3, 1952, 1.

Ottawa might have been in the midst of an unprecedented housing shortage, but, like the Edgewater further up the river before it, whatever was going to be built at Strathcona after it sold, Range Road residents were against it. On July 2, more than forty local residents submitted a petition to the Board of Control requesting that the city not dispose of the property. The opponents’ arguments were as familiar and as well-worn in 1952 as they continue to be today: they feared that their property values would decline and that the move would be against the existing building restriction by-law.13Ibid.; “Residents Oppose Commercial Use Of Strathcona Hospital,” Ottawa Journal, July 3, 1952, 16.

Community opposition, while not entirely welcome, was something that Council and the Board of Control was able to handle. What they were not ready for, however, was the limited interest in the property and of those who did express interest, the offers were well below the City’s reserve price.   The top bid of $85,000 was, according to Mayor Whitton, “not even within striking distance.” As a result, the Board of Control decided to retain the services of a local real estate firm.14”Strathcona Bids Low,” Ottawa Citizen, April 21, 1953, 14. The property was listed on the local Real Estate Board Co-operative two weeks later for $175,000.15”Ask $175,000 For Hospital,” Ottawa Citizen, May 6, 1953, 28.

Given the high hopes, the opening round of bids was disappointing. Should that not have been enough, The Property Owners’ Association came out swinging, charging that the City was in the habit of selling civic property at well below its market value. Some members of the Association also accused the city of selling large tracts of civic property to private contractors only to have those contractors turn around and sell individual lots up to twenty times what they paid the city. Finally, the Association did, however, commend the City for rejecting the low offers made for the Strathcona Hospital.16”Charge City Sells Lots For Fraction Of Value,” Ottawa Citizen, May 6, 1953, 20.

Strathcona Hospital from above in 1933. Image: NAPL A4571 Item 29.

“A deluxe mid-century edition of the Roxborough Apartments”

With the Civic’s new East Lawn Pavilion set to open on August 117”New Pavilion Opens Aug. 1 At Hospital,” Ottawa Citizen, July 17, 1953, 10; “New 8–Bed Pavilion at Civic Open to Patients on August 1,” Ottawa Journal, July 17, 1953, 3. The East Lawn Pavilion’s formal grand opening was held on December 15. See “Plan Extension of Pathology Building For Mental Patients,” Ottawa Citizen, December 16, 1953, 7., the City would soon be freed to concern itself with disposing of an empty hospital. By September, a frustrated Mayor Whitton suggested that if the Real Estate Board Co-operative listing was not going to work that she would drum up a buyer herself.18”Disposition Of Hospital Worries City,” Ottawa Citizen, September 16, 1953, 20.

She [Mayor Whitton] said the now vacant isolation hospital and nurses’ home which overlooks Strathcona Park on Range Road would be torn down to make way for a deluxe mid-century edition of the Roxborough Apartments.

“$2 Million Hotel Considered For Range Road,” Ottawa Journal, October 20, 1953, 1.

Just when it did not look like the lot was going to sell, developers began to take interest once again. In the October 20, 1953 edition of the Journal, it was reported that an unnamed out-of-town firm was interested in the property and imagined putting up a $2 million apartment-hotel on the site. Mayor Whitton described it as a “deluxe mid-century edition of the Roxborough Apartments”. The city was lacking in hotel space and two other projects (a Sheraton and an expansion for the Lord Elgin) were cancelled, so the prospect of more hotel rooms excited Whitton and the other Controllers.19”$2 Million Hotel Considered For Range Road,” Ottawa Journal, October 23, 1953, 1.

In April 1954, Garfield Weston’s Wittington Investments made another offer on the property. With an $80,000 bid in 1953, Wittington was the second-highest bidder in that round, but this time, the pot had been sweetened to $130,000 – still well below the City’s desired price of $175,000. Still, with no other bidders available, the offer was tempting. Under the terms of the sale, the City and Developer would each appoint a representative to a committee on architecture, who would in turn name a third member. The committee would study similar projects around the country and develop a pleasing design. Final architectural approval would be made by the Federal District Commission. The bid was an attractive one and Council accepted it during the April 20 session.20”Strathcona Hospital Sold For $130,000,” Ottawa Journal, April 20, 1954, 1; “$130,000 Bid Is Accepted By Council,” Ottawa Citizen, April 21, 1954, 4; “Sale of Former Strathcona Hospital Carries,” Ottawa Journal, April 21, 1954, 17. The sale was finalized in August.21Abstract, Plan 15632, Block 53, Sheet 5.

Local business interests also expressed their happiness with the outcome that at least two apartment-hotel projects were in then in the works as the lack of hotels in Ottawa made holding conventions highly difficult.22”Plan $2,000,000 Apartment Hotels Both for 1955,” Ottawa Journal, September 11, 1954, 3.

Although Range Road residents and their Councillor, Charles St. Germain were unhappy about the prospect of having an apartment, the sale was more than welcome to the City and Mayor Whitton expected that the old hospital and nurses’ residence would be torn down in the Fall.23”Strathcona Hospital Sold For $130,000,” Ottawa Journal, April 20, 1954, 1. The Journal reported on September 27 that it was expected that tenders would soon be called by Wittington for their demolition.24”Soon to Tear Down Strathcona Hospital,” Ottawa Journal, September 27, 1954, 33.

While waiting for demolition to start, the empty hospital had become something of an attractive nuisance. In September, two city employees were caught stealing a three horsepower motor from the facility in a commandeered City truck.25”Discharged For Theft,” Ottawa Citizen, September 14, 1954, 1. As demolition began in earnest that October, proverbial vultures began circling: it was filled with perfectly serviceable furniture and where it would go was up for some debate. Surplus hinged beds were coveted by the Fire Department for firefighters to relax while on the night shift, but that was opposed by Mayor Whitton.26”Hinged Hospital Beds Not For City Firemen,” Ottawa Citizen, October 6, 1954, 34.

In November 1954, the Board of Control approved the design of the new Sandringham Apartments. Image: Ottawa Citizen, November 2, 1954, 18.

In morning of November 2, Ottawa’s Board of Control unanimously approved Wittington’s plans for the Sandringham Apartments. Designed by Peter Dickinson of Toronto’s Page & Steele, the design was reported to “incorporate many ideas and facilities of Scandinavian origin.” An unconfirmed figure of $1.5 million was floated for the 11-storey 120-unit building. Doubtlessly, as part of her early-1950s Royal Fever, the name “Sandringham” was suggested by Mayor Whitton herself.27Sandringham being a residence of the then recently-crowned Elizabeth II. See: “Board Approves Plans For New Apartment,” Ottawa Citizen, November 2, 1954, 18; “A Touch of Scandinavia At the Top of Range Road,” Ottawa Journal, November 2, 1954, 18. The plan was well-like by the Board of Control and it was on the strength of those plans that the Board of Control selected the Page & Steele design, also by rising star Peter Dickinson, for the new police headquarters.28”Diplomacy Substituted For Debate As Council Clears Up Heavy Agenda,” Ottawa Citizen, November 16, 1954, 8.

The Sandringham Stalls Out, Gets Cancelled

For all the excitement surrounding the Sandringham, 1955 ushered in no movement. No shovels, no hammers, no concrete. By October, the Board of Control began to wonder when they would see their “touch of Scandinvaia” or modern-day Roxborough begin to rise over Strathcona Park and instructed Board Secretary Edgar Pearce to draft a letter to Wittington asking when they expected to start. The hold up? Wittington’s E.S. Sherwood explained that such a building required careful planning, but also implied that the company had to concern itself with return on investment. In other words, the luxury apartment market might have gone a bit soft. He declined to give a date.29”Board Asks Start On New Apartments,” Ottawa Citizen, October 26, 1955, 2.

I regret to inform you that I have decided it is not a practical or economical proposition to proceed with construction of these apartments. The class of development we had in mind could not be made a financial success in such a relatively small place as Ottawa.

Garfield Weston, as quoted in Ottawa Citizen, December 17, 1955, 3.

By December, what has been the stuff of fears and whispers has landed in printed form on the Mayor’s desk. In a letter from Garfield Weston himself, Wittington reported that the Sandringham project was cancelled on the basis of it not making economic sense, adding that the “class of development we [Wittington] had in mind could not be made a financial success in such a relatively small place as Ottawa.” Expressing disappointment, the Board of Control sought ways that it might re-acquire the property and stated that it would not permit a less expensive sort of apartment on the property.30”Apt. Plans Dropped: City May Re-Acquire Strathcona Park Land,” Ottawa Citizen, December 17, 1955, 3.

Walter Zwig and Jacob Henedeles Pick Up The Ball

Zwig and Hendeles took over the project and increased its scope considerably. Peter Diskinson’s name is clearly visible at the bottom right of the sketch. Source: Ottawa Citizen, October 24, 1956, 27.

Weston might not have been wrong to drop the plans as they were. With rents starting at $300 per month (about $2855 today) in his Sandringham project, prices were somewhat above what most Ottawans might have been willing and able to pay for an apartment. The well-regarded Tiffany Apartments in Centretown, for example, charged rents from $80-$140 per month.31Ottawa Journal, October 5, 1953, 32. Units in the Windsor Arms went for about $110 per month.32Ottawa Citizen, October 3, 1958, 41. Rents in the $300+ range weren’t entirely unheard of, however: Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent was reported to have paid $5000 per year ($416/mo. About $4000 per month today) for his suite at the Roxborough.33”Cost $20,297 To Operate Home Of PM,” Ottawa Citizen, January 15, 1953, 4. Still, Wittington’s Sandringham was aiming for a small rarified market.

The Sandringham begins construction, 1957. Image: Ottawa Citizen, March 27, 1958, 20.

The project wasn’t exactly dead, however. In June 1956, Toronto’s Walter Zwig and Jacob Hendeles signed an agreement for the property.34Abstract. Plan 15632 Lot 53 Page 5. The plan? The design was still Dickinson’s, but the project was much larger than what Wittington had proposed. In October, the Citizen reported that the Board of Control approved the new proposal forwarded by “a Toronto firm” for a $3,000,000 three-building apartment project containing 304 units: a considerable increase from the original plan for a single building with 134 units.35”Luxury Apt. Plan Okayed,” Ottawa Citizen, October 23, 1956, 1.

The Sandringham began construction soon after approval. The site had already been cleared, so Zwig and Hendeles were able to get to work quickly. Image: Ottawa Citizen, September 17, 1957, 36.

Construction on the first of what was to be three buildings began at the end of Spring 1957.36A $100,000 foundation permit for the $3,000,000 project was issued in April. See “Issue Permit To Start Giant Apartment Job,” Ottawa Citizen, April 8, 1957, 1. It appears that Zwig and Hendeles (via their Range Road Development Ltd.) also decided to take the bet on Ottawa’s luxury market: at least in the first building, rents were reported to begin at $300 per month. In a construction-period unmarked advertisement run in the Ottawa Citizen it was stated that the penthouse unit had already been rented out at a rate of $16,000 per year (just over $144,000 today). Construction of the second building was expected to begin the following March.37”New Building Features Super-Luxury Suites,” Ottawa Citizen, September 17, 1957, 36.

Tower 1 of The Sandringham, as seen from above in 1958. Image: geoOttawa / NAPL.

It is not entirely clear if earlier reports of “the penthouse” were fabricated or if they were just hopeful, but by the time the Sandringham was poised to welcome its first tenants, the Citizen reported that there was not, in fact, a penthouse at the Sandringham. The tenth floor instead housed two and three bedroom units, some of which had “an unobstructed view of the Gatineau Hills”, but there was no single penthouse.38”Apartments Won’t Have Penthouse,” Ottawa Citizen, April 14, 1958, 7.

1958-03-27-Cit-Five-Page-Spread-19-23

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Penthouse or no, The Sandringham nevertheless opened with a whole lot of promotion. In spite of reports of it being reduced to 85 units, the final tally for the apartment was 101 units, comprised of 12 bachelors, 22 one bedroom, 49 two bedroom, and 18 three bedroom units.39RAIC Journal 36, no. 8 (August 1959): 285.

Zwig and Hendeles might have unloaded The Sandringham quickly following construction, but the advertising and promotion budget appears to have stuck around. Image: RAIC Journal  36, no. 8 (August 1959): 284.

It was no sooner that The Sandringham reached completion that both the Citizen and the Journal reported that it had been sold. Commanding a price of $2 million, Zwig was unable to report the identity of the purchaser, but understood that they were based out of Montreal.40”Sandringham Apartments Sold For $2 Million,” Ottawa Journal, April 14, 1959, 1; “Closing Deal To Purchase Sandringham,” Ottawa Citizen, April 15, 1959, 9. The parcel abstract sheet identifies the purchaser as the Great West Life Assurance Company.41Abstract. Plan 15632 Lot 53 Page 6.

Typical floor plan in the Sandringham, as depicted in RAIC Journal. Image: RAIC Journal 36, no. 8 (August 1959): 284.

The sale of The Sandringham also meant the end of the three-building plan. As a tidy Peter Dickinson designed apartment that, in accordance with the vision, catered to a higher-end clientele and commanded above-average rents, the project was both a success and generally celebrated. Contemporary reports noted that even the surrounding neighbourhood tended to welcome the building.

It might have been the case that Zwig and Hendeles were not able to turn a quick enough profit to pay down their loans. Or that they lost faith in the Ottawa market. They do not appear to have been behind any other projects in the city.42If anybody knows of others, I’d be happy to be informed and revise this. We have not been left with any indicator as to why they were motivated to sell. It might have been the plan all along.

1959-08-RAIC-Journal-284-285

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As was the case with The Governor Metcalfe, Great West Life partnered with Montreal’s Mills-Rankin to operate the building. This arrangement remained in place until 1965, when – also like The Governor Metcalfe – the Sandringham was sold to a syndicate of Ottawa interests, chief of whom were Reuben and Samuel Palef. Although shares in the building were subsequently bought and sold, it remained in the Palef family until it was sold to Homestead in 2009, who owns and operates it today.43Cision. “Ottawa Trophy Apartment Property Sold by Primecorp Commercial Realty Inc.,” (June 26, 2009).

The Sandringham (Finally) Gets A Sibling

Zoning on the site of the former Strathcona Isolation Hospital lands changed frequently. Source: City of Ottawa. “Report: Official Plan Amendment – 85 Range Road,” June 10, 2010.

It would not be until 2015 that the Sandringham was joined on the property by a sibling. Soon after Homestead’s purchase in 2009, plans were filed with the City for a second 10-storey building, appropriately named the Balmoral.44Ottawa. “Report to Planning and Environment Committee and Council – Official Plan Amendment – 85 Range Road,” June 10, 2010. “Balmoral“, like Sandringham, also a property of the Royal Family, where Elizabeth II summers. As is the case with the Sandringham itself, rents and unit sizes at the Balmoral are aimed at a higher-income clientele.

The Balmoral in 2017. It took more than fifty years for The Sandringham to be joined by a sibling. Image: Google Maps, 2017.

Notes   [ + ]

1. ”‘Regan’s Hill’ Received It’s Name From Henry Regan and His Sons 185[?],” Ottawa Citizen, March 31, 1928, 16.
2. For a great tour of Dickinson’s work in Ottawa, see Robert Smythe’s “Peter Dickinson in Ottawa,” (2009).
3. Greg Connelley. “Strathcona Isolation Hospital To Be Sold,” Ottawa Citizen, May 10, 1950, 1, 20.
4. ”Modern Hospital For City Urged,” Ottawa Citizen, March 29, 1945, 12; “New Ottawa Hospital For Communicable Diseases Proposed,” Ottawa Journal, March 29, 1945, 12; “Report Strathcona To Be Controlled By Civic Hospital,” Ottawa Citizen, August 14, 1945, 11; “Object to Poles in Ottawa East,” Ottawa Citizen, September 18, 1945, 3; “Dr. Allan Doane Will Succeed Dr. W. T. Shirreff,” Ottawa Citizen, February 12, 1946, 12; “Strathcona Hospital Alterations Planned,” Ottawa Citizen, August 7, 1946, 6; “Require $50,000 To Modernize Strathona Hosp.,” Ottawa Journal, September 10, 1946, 14.
5. Not entirely different from the future sale of the current Main Branch of the Ottawa Public Library to defray costs of its replacement at Lebreton. Also see Ibid, Connelley.
6. ”Coulter Would Use Strathcona Hospital As Home for MPs,” Ottawa Journal, May 11, 1950, 1.
7. ”$500,000 Debenture Carries To Build an Isolation Unit,” Ottawa Journal, May 16, 1950, 9.
8. ”Department of Civic Affairs: Dedicated Chiefly of Ottawa’s Municipal Associations: Property Owners’ Association,” Ottawa Citizen, March 1, 1924, 4.
9. ”Objection Dropped,” Ottawa Citizen, July 3, 1950, 16.
10. ”Debentures Approved,” Ottawa Citizen, June 13, 1951, 20; “Extra $160,000 Debenture For Hospital,” Ottawa Journal, June 13, 1951, 1.
11. ”Hospital Site To Be Tax Producer,” Ottawa Journal, May 20, 1952, 3.
12. ”May Sell Hospital: Private Interests Seek Strathcona,” Ottawa Citizen, July 3, 1952, 1.
13. Ibid.; “Residents Oppose Commercial Use Of Strathcona Hospital,” Ottawa Journal, July 3, 1952, 16.
14. ”Strathcona Bids Low,” Ottawa Citizen, April 21, 1953, 14.
15. ”Ask $175,000 For Hospital,” Ottawa Citizen, May 6, 1953, 28.
16. ”Charge City Sells Lots For Fraction Of Value,” Ottawa Citizen, May 6, 1953, 20.
17. ”New Pavilion Opens Aug. 1 At Hospital,” Ottawa Citizen, July 17, 1953, 10; “New 8–Bed Pavilion at Civic Open to Patients on August 1,” Ottawa Journal, July 17, 1953, 3. The East Lawn Pavilion’s formal grand opening was held on December 15. See “Plan Extension of Pathology Building For Mental Patients,” Ottawa Citizen, December 16, 1953, 7.
18. ”Disposition Of Hospital Worries City,” Ottawa Citizen, September 16, 1953, 20.
19. ”$2 Million Hotel Considered For Range Road,” Ottawa Journal, October 23, 1953, 1.
20. ”Strathcona Hospital Sold For $130,000,” Ottawa Journal, April 20, 1954, 1; “$130,000 Bid Is Accepted By Council,” Ottawa Citizen, April 21, 1954, 4; “Sale of Former Strathcona Hospital Carries,” Ottawa Journal, April 21, 1954, 17.
21. Abstract, Plan 15632, Block 53, Sheet 5.
22. ”Plan $2,000,000 Apartment Hotels Both for 1955,” Ottawa Journal, September 11, 1954, 3.
23. ”Strathcona Hospital Sold For $130,000,” Ottawa Journal, April 20, 1954, 1.
24. ”Soon to Tear Down Strathcona Hospital,” Ottawa Journal, September 27, 1954, 33.
25. ”Discharged For Theft,” Ottawa Citizen, September 14, 1954, 1.
26. ”Hinged Hospital Beds Not For City Firemen,” Ottawa Citizen, October 6, 1954, 34.
27. Sandringham being a residence of the then recently-crowned Elizabeth II. See: “Board Approves Plans For New Apartment,” Ottawa Citizen, November 2, 1954, 18; “A Touch of Scandinavia At the Top of Range Road,” Ottawa Journal, November 2, 1954, 18.
28. ”Diplomacy Substituted For Debate As Council Clears Up Heavy Agenda,” Ottawa Citizen, November 16, 1954, 8.
29. ”Board Asks Start On New Apartments,” Ottawa Citizen, October 26, 1955, 2.
30. ”Apt. Plans Dropped: City May Re-Acquire Strathcona Park Land,” Ottawa Citizen, December 17, 1955, 3.
31. Ottawa Journal, October 5, 1953, 32.
32. Ottawa Citizen, October 3, 1958, 41.
33. ”Cost $20,297 To Operate Home Of PM,” Ottawa Citizen, January 15, 1953, 4.
34. Abstract. Plan 15632 Lot 53 Page 5.
35. ”Luxury Apt. Plan Okayed,” Ottawa Citizen, October 23, 1956, 1.
36. A $100,000 foundation permit for the $3,000,000 project was issued in April. See “Issue Permit To Start Giant Apartment Job,” Ottawa Citizen, April 8, 1957, 1.
37. ”New Building Features Super-Luxury Suites,” Ottawa Citizen, September 17, 1957, 36.
38. ”Apartments Won’t Have Penthouse,” Ottawa Citizen, April 14, 1958, 7.
39. RAIC Journal 36, no. 8 (August 1959): 285.
40. ”Sandringham Apartments Sold For $2 Million,” Ottawa Journal, April 14, 1959, 1; “Closing Deal To Purchase Sandringham,” Ottawa Citizen, April 15, 1959, 9.
41. Abstract. Plan 15632 Lot 53 Page 6.
42. If anybody knows of others, I’d be happy to be informed and revise this.
43. Cision. “Ottawa Trophy Apartment Property Sold by Primecorp Commercial Realty Inc.,” (June 26, 2009).
44. Ottawa. “Report to Planning and Environment Committee and Council – Official Plan Amendment – 85 Range Road,” June 10, 2010. “Balmoral“, like Sandringham, also a property of the Royal Family, where Elizabeth II summers.

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