Category: Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton (Page 1 of 9)

Second City, Second Metro: Extended Coverage for the Ottawa Hospital Council

The Ottawa Hospital Agency wanted to spread its wings a little. The Royal Ottawa was part of the Agency. Image: City of Ottawa Archives, CA008381 (1960).

In the same way that residents of the outside urban and township municipalities were anxious to either have freer access to Ottawa’s hospitals or have their own hospitals, the Ottawa Hospital Council was anxious to find a way to have those outside residents pay a few more bills. 

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Regional Council Meets for the First Time (1968)

Source: Ottawa Citizen, July 4, 1968, 17.

Months before it was even officially “a thing”, the first meeting of the Council of the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton was held on July 3, 1968. The aim was to set the stage for the regional municipality official first day of January 1.1Ottawa Citizen, July 4, 1968, 17.

I promise that I’m not trying to get ahead of myself: testimony and research from Murray Jones’ Commission will continue to be transcribed. 

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Notes   [ + ]

1. Ottawa Citizen, July 4, 1968, 17.

Second City, Second Metro: Nepean Needs a Hospital

Nepean had eyes on a lot, but not yet a building for its hospital. Image: geoOttawa (1965)

The rapidly-growing Nepean Township needed a hospital and much like Harold Denman, the Nepean Township Hospital Committee made sure its arguments for one were heard.

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Second City, Second Metro: Public School Board in Search of “an enlarged administrative area.”

The Ottawa Public School Board’s submission to the Jones Commission made it clear that its boundary should be the outer edge of the greenbelt.

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Second City, Second Metro: Ottawa Separate School Board – “the principal of equal opportunity is being violated.”

The Roman Catholic Separate School Board of Ottawa had one thing in mind when its submissions were made to the Jones Commission: money. Although the Board was pleased with what it was able to accomplish in Catholic education with the funds it had been allotted, the 70% difference in per-pupil funding vis-a-vis the Public School Board did not sit right.

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