Ottawa’s Apartments, 1955

J.R. Beach's 1950 apartment at 196 Metcalfe. Image: June 2016.
J.R. Beach’s 1950 Beach Apartments (now Algonquin Annex) at 196 Metcalfe. Image: June 2016.

Back in March, I transcribed the list of apartment buildings from the 1945 Might’s Directory of the City of Ottawa and ran some minor analysis of the proportion of apartment buildings in each of Ottawa’s neighbourhoods. I decided to jump ahead to 1955, as a massive transition in the Canadian housing market was well underway.

The Town House Apartments, 188 Lisgar, 1954. Image: April 2016.

As was the case for the 1945 list, I transcribed the 1955 list into an Excel spreadsheet and added to this site using TablePress.1Thus continuing the proud tradition of using Excel for projects that it really was not designed for. Aside from the 1955 list counting some 1198 apartment buildings (a 74.9% increase over 1945), there was an issue that may have been present in the 1945 list but was much less obvious.

Appin Apartments ,1939 (currently a co-operative/condominium), 243 McLeod. Image: April 2016.
Appin Apartments ,1939 (currently a co-operative/condominium), 243 McLeod. Image: April 2016.

One of the questions that I had become curious about while assigning a neighbourhood to the buildings in the list was of what proportion of these new buildings were part of large developments. Something dealt with at some length below. While counting those apartments that were constructed in Westboro, it became quite clear that Might’s apartment list was incomplete. Just how incomplete would not become clear until I decided to take the long way through the street directory, printed on the pink pages at the back of the book.

Forrest Bros. unnamed 1955 apartment at 45 Somerset W. The architect was J. Morris Woolfson. Image: April 2016.
Forrest Bros. unnamed 1955 apartment at 45 Somerset W. The architect was J. Morris Woolfson. Image: May 2016.

The conclusion? Well, as I noted above, the list at the front counted 990 individual buildings. The final tally by including the street directory was 1198 buildings. A 208 building difference. A note of caution, however. The apartment list at the front contains a number of 3 unit apartments – most often in the case that they were named. When collecting the unlisted apartments from the street directory, I did not collect additional 3 unit apartments that were not present on the list. Therefore, there will be some blend of apartment type in the list of apartments reproduced at the bottom of this page. Admittedly, this is much less discomforting than it could otherwise be, as it is also clear that Might’s clearly did not employ a rigorous method with which to classify what is an “apartment” and what is not.2As this is just the beginning of a very long project, once I have the data that I wish to have, I intend to look at each building in more detail to determine the number of units. For the time being, this is all quite preliminary and contingent on additional information.

The Algonquin was not yet constructed in 1955. Image: June 2016.
James Beach’s Algonquin Apartment-Hotel was not yet constructed in 1955. Image: June 2016.

Because of this, while I will be drawing some comparisons between 1945 and 1955, there is the caveat that I have not given 1945 the same treatment of going through the street directory. The 1945 apartment list could have been similarly incomplete leaving the number of apartments in Ottawa somewhat underreported for the time. The impression that I get, however, is that given the generally lethargic pace of construction through the Depression and Second World War, that this was much less of a problem for the 1945 edition.

A small building at 185 Frank St., constructed c. 1956. It has a twin directly behind at 196 Waverley. Image: May 2016.
A small building at 185 Frank St., constructed c. 1956. It has a twin directly behind at 196 Waverley. Image: May 2016.

Last time around, I identified apartments in the following neighbourhoods:

    1. Centretown3Defined by Gloucester (N), Bronson (W), Rideau Canal (E), Queensway (S). I plan to later break it down into Centretown “proper”, Golden Triangle, and the eastern portion of Chinatown.
    2. Downtown4Defined by the Ottawa River (N), Bronson (W), Rideau Canal (E), and Laurier (S). This can be broken down to some degree into portions, such as the old Upper Town and Midtown. “Downtown” has been subject to much shifting over the years.
    3. Sandy Hill5Defined by the south side of Rideau (N), Rideau Canal (W), Rideau River (E), and Mann Avenue (S). This will be further divided into Sandy Hill North, Sandy Hill South, and the University of Ottawa.
    4. Lowertown6Defined by Ottawa River (N), Rideau Canal/Entry Bay (W), Rideau River (E), north side of Rideau street (S). This will be further divided into The Byward Market, Lowertown West, Lowertown East, and Macdonald Gardens.
    5. The Glebe7Defined by Queensway (N), Dow’s Lake (W), Rideau Canal (E & S). This will be further divided into The Glebe and the Glebe Annex (much to my chagrin that west of Bronson didn’t get to create/retain its own identity).
    6. Ottawa South8Defined by the Rideau Canal (N), Bronson (W), Avenue Road (E), and the Rideau River (S).
    7. Ottawa East9Defined by Mann Avenue (N), Rideau Canal (W), Rideau River (E), and Avenue Road/Rideau River (S).
    8. Eastview (Vanier)10Defined by the borders of the former City of Vanier.
    9. Dalhousie11This one’s defined a little fuzzier, but it’s roughly in line with the Dalhousie Community Association. Roughly, Ottawa River (N), O-Train Tracks (W), Bronson (E), and Carling (W). I intend to further divide into something along the lines of LeBreton Flats, Little Italy, Nanny Goat Hill, Chinatown, and Mount Sherwood. This will likely change when it happens though.
    10. Hintonburg12Defined by Ottawa River (N), Holland Avenue (W), O-Train Tracks (E), and the Queensway (S). This will be further divided into Hintonburg and Mechanicsville.
    11. Wellington West13Defined as by Ottawa River (N), Island Park Drive (W), Holland Avenue (E), and the Queensway (S). This one’s also somewhat fuzzy, it did not experience much apartment construction until after the Second World War, so refinements will come later.
    12. New Edinburgh14Defined by the Ottawa River (N), Rideau River (W), Lisgar Road/Maple/Acacia (E), and the north side of Beechwood Avenue (S).
    13. Rockcliffe Park15Defined by the borders of the former Village of Rockcliffe Park.

Commensurate with development and the 1950 annexation, for this edition, I have added the following:

  1. Westboro16Defined by the current borders of the Westboro Community Association (plus some), roughly being Island Park to the east, Carling to the south, Denbury to the west, and the Ottawa River to the north.
  2. Overbrook 17Defined roughly as that area between the Rideau River to the west, Donald St. to the north, St. Laurent to the east, and the Queensway to the south.
  3. Laurentian View18Laurentian View / McKellar Park. Defined roughly by Woodroffe to the west, Richmond to the north, Denbury to the east, and Carling to the south.
  4. Carlington19Defined roughly by Maitland to the west, Carling to the north, Kingston and Caldwell to the south, and Fisher to the east.
  5. Woodroffe20Defined roughly by the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway to the west, Ottawa River to the north, Dominion to the east, and Richmond to the south.
  6. Manor Park21Defined by the Aviation Parkway to the east, Hemlock to the south, Birch to the west, and Sandridge to the north.
  7. Alta-Vista22Defined roughly by the unused corridor to the east, Heron to the south, the Rideau River to the east, and Smyth to the north.
  8. Cummings23Defined by the Aviation Parkway to the west, the Queensway to the south, St. Laurent to the west, and Montreal Road to the north.

The table below represents a tally of the number of apartment buildings identified in the 1955 Might’s Directory. As the 1945 tally was 685 apartment buildings, 1955’s 1198 buildings24The database above contains 1198 entries. Might’s collected a number of larger-scale developments into single listings and I have broken them out for the purposes of this tabulation. represents a 74.9% increase. As I will briefly discuss below, this is only part of the story.

With few exceptions, apartments were added to all neighbourhoods between 1945 and 1955. What may stand out is that greenfields development was particularly attractive, with Eastview (Vanier) and Westboro attracting the largest growth.

We can see here that Centretown retained its position atop the list as the neighbourhood with the greatest share of apartment buildings. Sandy Hill retained its position as the second, though its “lead” above the next would have been considerably less had it not been for the construction of the CMHC’s Strathcona Heights apartment cluster at the south end of the neighbourhood, which totaled 52 buildings.

Centretown and Sandy Hill retain their positions in 1955.

For my own purposes, it was the explosion of apartment construction in neighbourhoods like Eastview (Vanier), Westboro, and Carlington that really came to stand out. Eastview, for example, had just 5 apartments listed in the 1945 edition of Might’s. By 1955, there were 129 listed, a 2480% change in a decade.25In this case, I did review the 1945 edition of Might’s for apartments listed in the street directory. On its own, the increase would be something to take notice of. The form and delivery of this increase is also worth note and is ultimately what captured my attention.

Isaac Levine in front of his Crescent Hill Apartments, a seven building cluster along Chapleau street in New Edinburgh. February 12, 1954. He completed the project later that spring. Source: City of Ottawa Archives, Itemo CA003188.
Isaac Levine in front of his Crescent Hill Apartments, a seven building cluster along Chapleau street in New Edinburgh. February 12, 1954. He completed the project later that spring. Source: City of Ottawa Archives, Item CA003188.

The 1955 List

NameAddressNeighbourhood
Aberfeldy226 O'ConnorCentretown
Acadia229 WaverleyCentretown
Acon60 StewartSandy Hill
Addison2 DrivewayCentretown
Afton165 FlorenceCentretown
Ahearn64 ArthurDalhousie
Ajax331 MacLarenCentretown
Albany340 Somerset WCentretown
Alden207-211 O'ConnorCentretown
Aletea422 QueenDowntown
Allison126 Somerset WCentretown
Almonte31 FlorenceCentretown
Altro375 McKayNew Edinburgh
Ambassador Court612 BankGlebe
Amberleigh70 CollegeSandy Hill
Amherst458 Laurier WDowntown
Andrew50 MacLarenCentretown
Anna315 WilbrodSandy Hill
Annadale586 KirkwoodWestboro
Antrim181 WallerSandy Hill
Appin243 McLeodCentretown
Apsley Hall188 MetcalfeCentretown
Arcadian137 BayDowntown
Archambault73 ClarenceLowertown
Argyle37 ArgyleCentretown
Argyle467 Laurier WDowntown
Arlington15 ArlingtonCentretown
Armstrong149 Laurier WDowntown
Arrondale584 ChapelSandy Hill
Arthur83 ArthurDalhousie
Ashburnham11 PrimroseDalhousie
Ashton18 Somerset WCentretown
Astor248 ElginCentretown
Athlone225 MacLarenCentretown
Attleborough258 Laurier WDowntown
Auger236 BradleyEastview
Auger266 MarierEastview
Augusta542 RideauSandy Hill
Aurora794½ BankGlebe
Avenue127 SecondGlebe
Avilla334 BessererSandy Hill
Bachelor280 Laurier ESandy Hill
Badali138 SecondGlebe
Balfour254 CooperCentretown
Ballyshannon343½ LisgarCentretown
Bancroft36 ThirdGlebe
Bay135 BayDowntown
Beach196 MetcalfeCentretown
Beaconsfield Place240 GilmourCentretown
Beatrice150 RideauSandy Hill
Beaudry263 St. AndrewLowertown
Beaulieu24 McDougalSandy Hill
Beechwood94 BeechwoodEastview
Belgarde385 BessererSandy Hill
Belgrave Terrace322 FrankCentretown
Bell765 BankGlebe
Belle152 OsgoodeSandy Hill
Bellevue530 King EdwardSandy Hill
Belmont174 ClarenceLowertown
Belmont385 WaverleyCentretown
Belvedere154 DalySandy Hill
Benmore325 CooperCentretown
Berkley261 Laurier ESandy Hill
Bernice131-133 ChapelSandy Hill
Bessborough215 GladstoneCentretown
Bethany1188 GladstoneHintonburg
Beverley265 DalySandy Hill
Beverley346 Somerset WCentretown
Biltmore215 PercyCentretown
Binrock1 FloraCentretown
Blackburn92-94-94 BlackburnSandy Hill
Blackburn223 Somerset WCentretown
Blackburn Court99 BlackburnSandy Hill
Blake View280 BlakeEastview
Bonnie Brae574 KirkwoodWestboro
Bordley188 StewartSandy Hill
Boulanger143 NepeanCentretown
Bourque346-352 BruyereLowertown
Bower157 JamesCentretown
Bradley140 ArthurDalhousie
Braemar171 LisgarCentretown
Brentwood221 GilmourCentretown
Brock167 FlorenceCentretown
Brockton Court126 CatherineCentretown
Bromley459-465 MetcalfeCentretown
Bronson292 BronsonDalhousie
Brunswick280 CrichtonNew Edinburgh
Buckingham400 CumberlandSandy Hill
Burg253 CrichtonSandy Hill
Cairo269 SlaterDowntown
Calgarian353-357 FrankCentretown
Cameron1210-1216 BankOld Ottawa South
Campbell139-141 PrestonDalhousie
Carisbrooke216½ BankCentretown
Carisbrooke Annex212½ BankCentretown
Carleton Manor210 ChapelSandy Hill
Carling114-116 CarlingGlebe
Carlrita883 Somerset WDalhousie
Carlyle46 CarlyleOld Ottawa South
Carman185 StewartSandy Hill
Carmen140 FrielLowertown
Cartler117-119 CooperCentretown
Cavendish260 Laurier ESandy Hill
Cayer80 DukeDalhousie
Central360-370 SlaterDowntown
Chalmers335 CooperCentretown
Chamberlain Manor333 MetcalfeCentretown
Chapel243 ChapelSandy Hill
Chapel Court309-311 DalySandy Hill
Chapel Hill350 ChapelSandy Hill
Charbonneau218 DalhousieLowertown
Charles301 WilbrodSandy Hill
Charlotte106 CharlotteLowertown
Charlotte Court430 DalySandy Hill
Chateau781 Somerset WDalhousie
Chateauguay95 GloucesterCentretown
Chattan171 FrankCentretown
Churchill327 CambridgeDalhousie
Churchill Annex329-331 CambridgeDalhousie
Churchill127 CatherineCentretown
Churchill Court275 FrielSandy Hill
Clairemount 60 CobourgLowertown
Clarence110½ ClarenceLowertown
Clarendon5 FlorenceCentretown
Clarey26 ClareyGlebe
Clark201 MacLarenCentretown
Claudette100 King EdwardLowertown
Clayton416 Laurier WDowntown
Clemow Court325 ClemowGlebe
Cleveland345 Laurier WDowntown
Clifford344 GladstoneCentretown
Cliffview68 BronsonDalhousie
Clifton591 O'ConnorGlebe
Clovelly Court199 ChapelSandy Hill
Cobourg124 CobourgLowertown
Colonial179 CobourgSandy Hill
Commodore428 RideauSandy Hill
Condon544 RideauSandy Hill
Congress172 MacLarenCentretown
Connaught455 BessererSandy Hill
Connor Court250 O'ConnorCentretown
Corona253 DalySandy Hill
Coronation260½ DalhousieLowertown
Cosy Court465 McLeodCentretown
Cosy Home390 FrankCentretown
Courtland Arms225 KentCentretown
Cowan47 CameronOld Ottawa South
Creighton245 CrichtonNew Edinburgh
Crescent53 PrimroseDalhousie
Crofton265 QueenDowntown
Crown376 ElginCentretown
Cumberland412 CumberlandSandy Hill
Cundell58 HasteySandy Hill
Curtis98 O'ConnorDowntown
Cypress474 CooperCentretown
Dalhousie281 DalhousieLowertown
Davidson518 MacLarenCentretown
Davidson Place 571 WellingtonDalhousie
Delta173 DalySandy Hill
Derby Court352 GilmourCentretown
Derlingcourt136-138 SlaterDowntown
Desmonde214 GloucesterCentretown
De Valois178 ClarenceLowertown
De Vere480 CooperCentretown
Devonshire285½ Laurier WDowntown
Devonshire Annex279½ Laurier WDowntown
Dorchester220 WaverleyCentretown
Doric185½ RideauLowertown
Dorwick201-207 BessererSandy Hill
Douglas552 GilmourCentretown
Douglas139 StewartSandy Hill
Dresden222 ElginCentretown
Dubois48 DalySandy Hill
Duke347-351 GladstoneCentretown
Duncannon216 MetcalfeCentretown
Dundee381 KentCentretown
Dundonald487 MacLarenCentretown
Dunne305 GloucesterCentretown
Dunne Annex217 LyonCentretown
Earlscourt383 AlbertDowntown
East Arm195 OsgoodeSandy Hill
Edgar800½ BankGlebe
Edgar225 St. PatrickLowertown
Edgewater60 StanleyNew Edinburgh
Edgewood297 RichmondWestboro
Edmond453 LewisCentretown
Edward326 LyonCentretown
Eileen468 ClarenceLowertown
Eleanorcourt359 GilmourCentretown
Elgin370 ElginCentretown
Elinora210 Somerset ESandy Hill
Elinore179 BankCentretown
Ellen O110 NepeanCentretown
Ellsworth366 FrankCentretown
Elm200 FrielLowertown
Elmcrest Court135A-135B BayDowntown
Elmdale Court1270 WellingtonWellington West
Elmscourt189 Laurier ESandy Hill
Elmire144-146 SlaterDowntown
Eloise108 MurrayLowertown
Elsona60 FirstGlebe
Embassy Court345 Laurier ESandy Hill
Empire507 BessererSandy Hill
Erindale173 CooperCentretown
Ermac135 ConcordOld Ottawa East
Errol202A GloucesterCentretown
Esther122 CobourgLowertown
Estherel300 WilbrodSandy Hill
Etta180 AugustaSandy Hill
Evelyn231-233 ArgyleCentretown
Excello475 Somerset WCentretown
Fairmont60 FairmontHintonburg
Fermoy304 CumberlandLowertown
Ferncourt376 MacLarenCentretown
Fifth Avenue344 FifthGlebe
Fleur-de-Lys209 FrielLowertown
Florence221 FlorenceCentretown
Foch33 CollegeSandy Hill
Foster Hall329 KentCentretown
Foster's Triplex258 KentCentretown
Francis424 LisgarCentretown
Franklin318 Laurier WDowntown
Frontenac840 SomersetDalhousie
G-W Apartments373 CooperCentretown
Gainsborough285-289 MetcalfeCentretown
Gartmore84 CarlingGlebe
Gaulin307 DalhousieLowertown
George49 RoseLowertown
Gervais380 MurrayLowertown
Gilbert293 LisgarCentretown
Gilbert180 ClarenceLowertown
Gilmour225 GilmourCentretown
Glademore221 GladstoneCentretown
Gladstone309 GladstoneCentretown
Gladstone374 GladstoneCentretown
Glenarvon236 LisgarCentretown
Glen Eagle Court328 ClemowGlebe
Glenholm168 FirstGlebe
Glenwood67 DalySandy Hill
Gloucester140 GloucesterCentretown
Goldwyn1230 WellingtonWellington West
Gordon203 FifthGlebe
Goulburn177 GoulburnSandy Hill
Graham Chambers206 Laurier WDowntown
Grant132 St. PatrickLowertown
Grayce352 GladstoneCentretown
Graziadeis58 ParentLowertown
Grendley292 FrankCentretown
Grenville147 FifthGlebe
Grenville Annex149 FifthGlebe
Grenville444 CumberlandSandy Hill
Greylock445-447 Somerset WCentretown
Greystone136 BayDowntown
Grimbsy260 Somerset WCentretown
Grosvenor416 Somerset WCentretown
Guigues90 GuiguesLowertown
Hammond707 AlbertDalhousie
Hampton377 GladstoneCentretown
Harman279½ ElginCentretown
Hart328 GloucesterCentretown
Hart Court131 HawthorneOld Ottawa East
Harvey430 MacLarenCentretown
Hawthorne96 HawthorneOld Ottawa East
Heather303 CambridgeDalhousie
Helena125 GlenoraOld Ottawa East
Helena231 WaverleyCentretown
Hickman105-107 PrestonDalhousie
Hillcrest316 BessererSandy Hill
Hillview352 BellDalhousie
Hillview481 SlaterDowntown
Himsworth81 Somerset WCentretown
Holbrook404-406 ElginCentretown
Hollywood233 NepeanCentretown
Holmdene465 Somerset WCentretown
Holmleigh66 FifthGlebe
Homelike126 CambridgeDalhousie
Hopeworth Court170 Laurier ESandy Hill
Hunter126 AlbertDowntown
Hyde Court290 MonaEastview
Ida15 OsgoodeSandy Hill
Imperial273 SlaterDowntown
Intercolonial Court253-257 YorkLowertown
Iona122-124 SecondGlebe
Iona Mansions1127 WellingtonHintonburg
Iroquois152 FirstGlebe
Irving114 IrvingHintonburg
Ivanhoe320 WaverleyCentretown
James Court250 CooperCentretown
Jewel550 O'ConnorGlebe
Joanisse32 MarierEastview
Jock142-146 PrimroseDalhousie
Johnston Court580 KirkwoodWestboro
Joy208 Somerset WCentretown
Jocelyn1102 Somerset WHintonburg
Julien134 GuiguesLowertown
Juliette12 ElectricNew Edinburgh
Kay579 Somerset WCentretown
Kealey17 McDougalSandy Hill
Keefer121 KeeferNew Edinburgh
Kelso53 MacLarenCentretown
Kelvin Court311 LisgarCentretown
Kemnay221 QueenDowntown
Kenilworth200 ElginCentretown
Kenmore90-92 MarlboroughSandy Hill
Kenneway293 Somerset WCentretown
Kenniston341-359 ElginCentretown
Kenniston200 WaverleyCentretown
Kent House293 KentCentretown
Kentbrook151 GloucesterCentretown
Kenwood155 O'ConnorCentretown
Kert433 BessererSandy Hill
Kertstone Court195 CooperCentretown
Killarney367 StewartSandy Hill
Kincora130 MacLarenCentretown
King232 CooperCentretown
King Edward135 King EdwardLowertown
King's Arms305 Laurier ESandy Hill
Kingsbury396 LisgarCentretown
Kingston256 BankCentretown
Kingsway160 LyonDowntown
Kitchener198 O'ConnorCentretown
Lady Hamilton151 NelsonLowertown
Lafontaine503 CumberlandSandy Hill
Lafontaine333 LafontaineEastview
Lake View346 FifthGlebe
Lancaster342 FrankCentretown
Landriault36 RussellSandy Hill
Landriault54-56 RideauSandy Hill
Lansdowne38 MonkGlebe
La Salle252 FrankCentretown
Latouraine34 ElectricNew Edinburgh
Laurentian71 SpadinaHintonburg
Laurier455 Laurier WDowntown
Laurin294 WaverleyCentretown
Lauzon257 SussexLowertown
Laval Court32 IrvingHintonburg
LeBel33 HeneyLowertown
LeBel Annex35 HeneyLowertown
Le Breton121 LeBretonDalhousie
Lecours J.L.C.101 ParentLowertown
Leinster26 GloucesterCentretown
Lemay175 DalhousieLowertown
Leonard10 LeonardOld Ottawa South
Lincoln356 RideauSandy Hill
Linden503 King EdwardSandy Hill
Linton271 Laurier ESandy Hill
Lisgar227 BankCentretown
Livingstone280 CarlingGlebe
Lochmore419-423 ThirdGlebe
Lots287 Somerset ESandy Hill
London Arms151 MetcalfeCentretown
Lord Amherst38-40 NepeanCentretown
Lord Nelson157 NelsonLowertown
Loretta96 CharlotteLowertown
Lorne233 WaverleyCentretown
Lorraine28 GilmourCentretown
Lorraine54 SpadinaHintonburg
Louise47 MargueriteOverbrook
Louvain120 RochesterDalhousie
Lucerne207 CharlotteSandy Hill
Lyngar310 ByronWestboro
Lynwood395 ChapelSandy Hill
MAE Apartments677 Somerset WDalhousie
MacDonald107 MetcalfeDowntown
MacKenzie191 McLeodCentretown
MacLaren52 MacLarenCentretown
MacLaren171 MacLarenCentretown
Maclyn88 NepeanCentretown
Major175-179 WilbrodSandy Hill
Major Hill431 SussexLowertown
Manchester278 WilbrodSandy Hill
Manhattan235 CooperCentretown
Manoir Champlain125 SussexLowertown
Manor Courts296 MonaEastview
Maple Court534 King EdwardSandy Hill
Maplevere173 FlorenceCentretown
Marlborough34-36 CooperCentretown
Marlborough110 MarlboroughSandy Hill
Martin230 BessererSandy Hill
Martin Terrace521 King EdwardSandy Hill
Mary459 MacLarenCentretown
Marymount101-105 WaverleyCentretown
Math328 St. AndrewLowertown
Maurice183 WaverleyCentretown
Mavis184 OsgoodeSandy Hill
Mayfair260 MetcalfeCentretown
Maymar77 FlorenceCentretown
Maymont86 EmpressDalhousie
Maytime408 SunnysideOld Ottawa South
McClintock220 WurtemburgSandy Hill
McCord374-380 Somerset WCentretown
McCormick54 Somerset WCentretown
McCullough8 TormeyLowertown
McIntosh305 WaverleyCentretown
McKay Court350 McKayNew Edinburgh
McKegg Court334 BronsonDalhousie
McKinley489 CooperCentretown
McLennan85 NepeanCentretown
Merton169 Laurier WDowntown
Metcalfe81 MetcalfeDowntown
Metcalfe Terrace340-342 MetcalfeCentretown
Milo Court145 EchoOld Ottawa East
Minto342 McKayNew Edinburgh
Molot20 HeneyLowertown
Mons834 BankGlebe
Montcalm215 FrielLowertown
Montrose358 LisgarCentretown
Moretta480 RideauSandy Hill
Morin52 St. AndrewLowertown
Mount Sherwood414½ ArlingtonDalhousie
Mount Sherwood438 CambridgeDalhousie
Mountbatten314 Somerset ESandy Hill
Namur117 ChapelLowertown
Nepean Court255 NepeanCentretown
Nerbank360 GladstoneCentretown
New Ross204 Laurier ESandy Hill
Nicholas393 NelsonSandy Hill
Norman Court201 CooperCentretown
Normandie485 King EdwardSandy Hill
North York209 YorkLowertown
Northcliffe600 Laurier WDalhousie
Norway178 NepeanCentretown
Nottingham Court351 FrielSandy Hill
Oak Hill Lodge480 Oak HillRockcliffe Park
Oakland1119 BankOld Ottawa South
Oliver170 SecondGlebe
O'Neill414 SlaterDowntown
Osgoode79 GoulburnSandy Hill
Osnabruck514 BayCentretown
Ossington1192 BankOld Ottawa South
Ottawa901 SomersetDalhousie
Pacific House173 BroadDalhousie
Palace Court407 ElginCentretown
Park262 ParkEastview
Park Square425 ElginCentretown
Parkdale390-392 ElginCentretown
Parkview126 CobourgLowertown
Parkview143 EchoOld Ottawa East
Parkview Manor155 GilmourCentretown
Parma Hall295 FrankCentretown
Peerless72 MetcalfeDowntown
Percival55-59 Laurier ESandy Hill
Percival1-3 PercyCentretown
Peter21½ YorkLowertown
Phillip278 CrichtonNew Edinburgh
Pleydell360 SlaterDowntown
Poirier160 St. PatrickLowertown
Pothier14-16 BruyereLowertown
Powell215 GilmourCentretown
Premier117 O'ConnorDowntown
Preston219 RideauLowertown
Pretoria217 PretoriaGlebe
Pretoria575 BankGlebe
Primrose787 Somerset WDalhousie
Prince Albert 2 TormeyLowertown
Prince Charles Court641 RideauLowertown
Prince Charles Court643 RideauLowertown
Prince Charles Court645 RideauLowertown
Prince Charles Court647 RideauLowertown
Prince Charles Court649 RideauLowertown
Prince of Wales474 ElginCentretown
Prince Rupert585 O'ConnorGlebe
Putnam360-364 LisgarCentretown
Queen255 DalySandy Hill
Queen Elizabeth201 MetcalfeCentretown
Queen Mary413 ElginCentretown
Quinn74 ThirdSandy Hill
Racine165 DalhousieLowertown
Racine99 CathcartLowertown
Racine Annex125 BruyereLowertown
Radmore43 FlorenceCentretown
Raeburn421 LisgarCentretown
Raephil515 CambridgeDalhousie
Ranger179 BroadDalhousie
Rawdon158 BankDowntown
Regal A290 Booth Dalhousie
Regal B807 Somerset WDalhousie
Regal C811 Somerset WDalhousie
Regent322 CooperCentretown
Regent Court33 RegentGlebe
Regina205 CharlotteSandy Hill
Rheaume218 CumberlandLowertown
Rialto415 BankCentretown
Richelieu364 ChapelSandy Hill
Richmond470 AlbertDowntown
Ritz Carlton97 DalySandy Hill
Ritzmore400 FrielSandy Hill
Riverside21 FentimanOld Ottawa South
Roberta512 RideauSandy Hill
Roberta Court180 CooperCentretown
Rochdale320 CooperCentretown
Rochester35 RochesterDalhousie
Rockminster192 MacLarenCentretown
Rockwood22 RockwoodLowertown
Rocque48 BruyereLowertown
Romaleen20 NepeanCentretown
Rose121 NepeanCentretown
Roseberry1 RoseberryGlebe
Rosedale100 HawthorneOld Ottawa East
Roseleigh75 ThirdGlebe
Rosemill254 RideauSandy Hill
Rosemount165 Laurier ESandy Hill
Rosetta779½ BankGlebe
Ross468 ElginCentretown
Rothesay135 NepeanCentretown
Rothesay172 O'ConnorCentretown
Roxborough89 Laurier WDowntown
Royal Arms257 DalySandy Hill
Royal Arms235 CharlotteSandy Hill
Royal Court405 ElginCentretown
Royal York180 LisgarCentretown
Royce112 WaverleyCentretown
Ruskin479 CooperCentretown
Russell255 MetcalfeCentretown
Russell Court320 Montreal RoadEastview
Rutland264 LisgarCentretown
Sagamore382 GladstoneCentretown
St. Cadoc218 WaverleyCentretown
St. Jean41 MainOld Ottawa East
St. Pierre51 St. AndrewLowertown
St. Regis183 Somerset WCentretown
Saslove8 ChapelLowertown
Scanborough579 LisgarCentretown
Scobie203 GladstoneCentretown
Selkirk46 MacLarenCentretown
Selton288 NelsonSandy Hill
Seymour360 FrielSandy Hill
Shaftesbury210 StewartSandy Hill
Shalom259 DalySandy Hill
Shane75 HollandHintonburg
Shefford300 CooperCentretown
Shelbourne196 JamesCentretown
Shirland21 FlorenceCentretown
Shirley Court82 FrielLowertown
Shorncliffe384 MacLarenCentretown
Sidenham Court234 CharlotteSandy Hill
Sidmore300½ WilbrodSandy Hill
Slater374-378 SlaterDowntown
Sorrento315 FrankCentretown
Spadina63-65 SpadinaHintonburg
Springfield2 BeechwoodEastview
Springfield LodgeArdmoreWoodroffe
Standish258 ElginCentretown
Stanford246 GilmourCentretown
Stanley281 Laurier ESandy Hill
Stanley190 StanleyNew Edinburgh
Stanwix404 DalySandy Hill
Statesman145 StewartSandy Hill
Stevens300 Somerset WCentretown
Stewart258 StewartSandy Hill
Stewarton527 BankCentretown
Stonehall214 MetcalfeCentretown
Stratford318 CooperCentretown
Strathcona148 GoulburnSandy Hill
Strathcona404 Laurier ESandy Hill
Strathcona Block310 Somerset ESandy Hill
Sula263-265 SlaterDowntown
Sunny Court228 FifthGlebe
Sunset Court921 BronsonGlebe
Surrey137 SecondGlebe
Sussex461 SussexLowertown
Sutherland216 CooperCentretown
Sweetland2 SweetlandSandy Hill
Taillefer47 HeneyLowertown
Tate28 RoseberryGlebe
Temple Court186 WaverleyCentretown
Tetbury389 CooperCentretown
Theresa261 FifthGlebe
Tiffany150 DrivewayCentretown
Tillie1070 WellingtonWellington West
Titley52 RussellSandy Hill
Tormey and Annex179 Laurier ESandy Hill
Town House 188 LisgarCentretown
Towner111 ArlingtonCentretown
Tracy238 GilmourCentretown
Trafalgar335 MetcalfeCentretown
Traymore262 FrielSandy Hill
Trianon275 Laurier ESandy Hill
Trio32 MacLarenCentretown
Troy424 BankCentretown
Tweedsmuir475 King EdwardSandy Hill
Union St. Joseph325 DalhousieLowertown
Val Cartier61 CartierCentretown
Valin435 SussexLowertown
Valiquette58-60 BlackburnSandy Hill
Valmar25 ClarenceLowertown
Venn69-71 ElmDalhousie
Verdun589½ BankGlebe
Vermont240 OsgoodeSandy Hill
Victoria250 FrankCentretown
Victory20 CharlotteLowertown
Viking129 ConcordOld Ottawa East
Vimy 244 CharlotteSandy Hill
Vimy Annex489 WilbrodSandy Hill
Virginia213 FrankCentretown
Waldemar290 GloucesterCentretown
Waldemar114 Somerset WCentretown
Waldo200 Laurier ESandy Hill
Waldron408 SlaterDowntown
Wallace417 ElginCentretown
Walsh555 Somerset WCentretown
Walton205 O'ConnorCentretown
Waltonia114 CambridgeDalhousie
Wanita152 GoulburnSandy Hill
Warren515 Laurier WDowntown
Warrington415 ElginCentretown
Washington275 DalhousieLowertown
Waterbury509 RideauLowertown
Waterton408 AlbertDowntown
Waverley216 WaverleyCentretown
Wayne22-24 St. FrancisHintonburg
Weldon Court424 Laurier WDowntown
Welland344 FrankCentretown
Wellington Court633 WellingtonDalhousie
Welwyn414 AlbertDowntown
Wembley201 O'ConnorCentretown
Wentworth202 ElginCentretown
Western118 RochesterDalhousie
Westhaven1424 CarlingCarlington
Westhaven1382 ColdreyCarlington
Westhaven1398 ColdreyCarlington
Westhaven1381 ColdreyCarlington
Westhaven1397 ColdreyCarlington
Westhaven815 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven825 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven831 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven839 Kirkwood Carlington
Westhaven845 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven851 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven873 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven879 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven887 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven812 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven824 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven830 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven838 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven844 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven852 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven874 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven880 KirkwoodCarlington
Westhaven888 KirkwoodCarlington
Westview700 ColeWestboro
Westwood298 ArlingtonCentretown
Whitehall655 RideauLowertown
Wilbrod302 WilbrodSandy Hill
Will Court81 PlymouthDalhousie
Williams651 CumberlandSandy Hill
Willingdon265 Laurier ESandy Hill
Willowdale441-443 EchoOld Ottawa East
Winchester324 O'ConnorCentretown
Windermere206 BronsonDalhousie
Windsor366 Laurier WDowntown
Windsor30 WindsorOld Ottawa South
Windsor Arms150 ArgyleCentretown
Winona508 BessererSandy Hill
Winsome353 LyonCentretown
Winston110 GloucesterCentretown
Woodlawn12 WoodlawnGlebe
Worthing154 ChapelLowertown
Wright Court698 BronsonDalhousie
Wurtemberg120 WurtembergLowertown
Wycliffe361 WilbrodSandy Hill
Wyndham200 StewartSandy Hill
York328 OsgoodeSandy Hill
395 AlbertDowntown
397 AlbertDowntown
399 AlbertDowntown
401 AlbertDowntown
403 AlbertDowntown
485 AlbertDowntown
486-488 AlbertDowntown
504 AlbertDowntown
525 AlbertDowntown
83 AliceEastview
91 AliceEastview
100 AliceEastview
101 AliceEastview
110 AliceEastview
288 AlthaEastview
252 ArgyleCentretown
72 ArlingtonCentretown
270 ArlingtonCentretown
371 ArlingtonCentretown
106 ArmstrongHintonburg
303 ArthurDalhousie
103 BankDowntown
180½ BankCentretown
245½ BankCentretown
581½ BankGlebe
931 BankGlebe
242 BayCentretown
75 BeechwoodNew Edinburgh
279 BlakeEastview
285 BlakeEastview
291 BlakeEastview
292 BlakeEastview
296 BlakeEastview
297 BlakeEastview
298 BlakeEastview
303 BlakeEastview
308 BlakeEastview
309 BlakeEastview
310 BlakeEastview
311 BlakeEastview
315 BlakeEastview
316 BlakeEastview
368 BlakeEastview
372 BlakeEastview
376 BlakeEastview
380 BlakeEastview
384 BlakeEastview
388 BlakeEastview
392 BlakeEastview
396 BlakeEastview
400 BlakeEastview
404 BlakeEastview
412 BlakeEastview
416 BlakeEastview
420 BlakeEastview
265 BoothDalhousie
155 BroadDalhousie
99 BronsonDowntown
72-74 BronsonDalhousie
100 BronsonDalhousie
140 BronsonDalhousie
197 BronsonCentretown
865 BronsonGlebe
272 ByronWestboro
454 ByronWestboro
458 ByronWestboro
99 CarlingDalhousie
152 CarlingGlebe
25 CartierCentretown
30 CartierCentretown
63 CartierCentretown
20 ChamplainNew Edinburgh
21 ChamplainNew Edinburgh
24 ChamplainNew Edinburgh
25 ChamplainNew Edinburgh
28 ChamplainNew Edinburgh
360 ChapelSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights700 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights702 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights725-727 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights728 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights730 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights736-742 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights743-747 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights746-752 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights755 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights765 Chapel CrescentSandy Hill
557 ChurchillWestboro
105 ClarenceLowertown
269 ClarenceLowertown
20 ClareyGlebe
38 ClareyGlebe
Riverside Terrace181 ClearviewWestboro
Riverside Terrace187 ClearviewWestboro
Riverside Terrace201 ClearviewWestboro
Riverside Terrace209 ClearviewWestboro
Riverside Terrace225 ClearviewWestboro
Riverside Terrace226 ClearviewWestboro
21 CooperCentretown
160 CooperCentretown
170 CooperCentretown
224 CooperCentretown
359 CooperCentretown
Riverside Terrace225 CorbettWestboro
314 CrichtonNew Edinburgh
89 DalySandy Hill
115 DalySandy Hill
119 DalySandy Hill
209 DalySandy Hill
315-317 DalySandy Hill
344 DalySandy Hill
425-429 DalySandy Hill
31 DesjardinsLowertown
86 DonaldOverbrook
94 DonaldOverbrook
133 DonaldOverbrook
416 DovercourtWestboro
4 EcclesDalhousie
37 EcclesDalhousie
Tillbury Terrace726 EdisonWestboro
Riverside Terrace190 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace191 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace194 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace197 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace207 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace208 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace212 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace214 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace216 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace218 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
Riverside Terrace220 Ellendale CrescentWestboro
72 FifthGlebe
74 FifthGlebe
76-78 FifthGlebe
157 FirstGlebe
163 FirstGlebe
141 FleetDalhousie
157 FloraCentretown
306 FrankCentretown
309 FrankCentretown
93 GenestEastview
526 GladstoneCentretown
Strathcona Heights305 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights307 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights309 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights310 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights311 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights312 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights315 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights317 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights319 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights321 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights325 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights327 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights328 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights329 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights330 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights331 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights332 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights335 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights337 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights350 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights353 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights360 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights362 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights368 Goulburn CrescentSandy Hill
267 GreenswayEastview
168 HawthorneOld Ottawa East
15 HillDalhousie
151 HolmwoodGlebe
4 Howick PlaceGlebe
14 Howick PlaceGlebe
526 King EdwardSandy Hill
75 LandryEastview
33 LangevinNew Edinburgh
61 LangevinNew Edinburgh
64 LangevinNew Edinburgh
65 LangevinNew Edinburgh
Riverside Terrace212 LatchfordWestboro
Riverside Terrace214 LatchfordWestboro
Riverside Terrace216 LatchfordWestboro
Riverside Terrace218 LatchfordWestboro
Riverside Terrace220 LatchfordWestboro
557 Laurier WDowntown
576 Laurier WDowntown
601 Laurier WDalhousie
603 Laudier WDalhousie
1349 LeasideCarlington
252 LisgarCentretown
91 MacLarenCentretown
217 MacLarenCentretown
591 MacLarenCentretown
Strathcona Heights80 MannSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights82 MannSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights84 MannSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights86 MannSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights90 MannSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights118 MannSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights120 MannSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights122 MannSandy Hill
49 MarierEastview
Kingsview Gardens29 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens30 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens39 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens40 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens49 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens50 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens59 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens60 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens69 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens70 MarkEastview
Kingsview Gardens80 MarkEastview
19 McDougalSandy Hill
Tillbury Terrace725 MelbourneWestboro
100 MetcalfeDowntown
280 MetcalfeCentretown
283 MetcalfeCentretown
287 MetcalfeCentretown
289 MetcalfeCentretown
379 MetcalfeCentretown
120 MurrayLowertown
46 NelsonLowertown
36 NepeanCentretown
123 NepeanCentretown
174 NepeanCentretown
237 NepeanCentretown
333 NepeanCentretown
263 O'ConnorCentretown
274 O'ConnorCentretown
276 O'ConnorCentretown
281 O'ConnorCentretown
508 O'ConnorGlebe
495 PercyCentretown
Strathcona Heights3 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights5 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights10 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights12 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights15 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights17 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights18 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights20 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights25 Philip CourtSandy Hill
Strathcona Heights26 Philip CourtSandy Hill
181 PrestonDalhousie
72 PretoriaGlebe
29 PutmanNew Edinburgh
69 PutmanNew Edinburgh
73 PutmanNew Edinburgh
77 PutmanNew Edinburgh
81 PutmanNew Edinburgh
403 QueenDowntown
31 RegentGlebe
176½ RideauSandy Hill
216 Rideau TerraceNew Edinburgh
563 RiverdaleOld Ottawa South
565 RiverdaleOld Ottawa South
571 RiverdaleOld Ottawa South
573 RiverdaleOld Ottawa South
279 St. AndrewLowertown
348-350 St. AndrewLowertown
66 St. CharlesEastview
156 St. PatrickLowertown
635 St. PatrickLowertown
637 St. PatrickLowertown
661 St. PatrickLowertown
192 SecondGlebe
135 SlaterDowntown
137 SlaterDowntown
146 SlaterDowntown
350 SlaterDowntown
380 SlaterDowntown
412 SlaterDowntown
467 SlaterDowntown
327 Somerset ESandy Hill
329-331 Somerset ESandy Hill
40 Somerset WCentretown
68 Somerset WCentretown
138 Somerset WCentretown
141 Somerset WCentretown
149 Somerset WCentretown
185 Somerset WCentretown
191 Somerset WCentretown
215 Somerset WCentretown
418 Somerset WCentretown
425 Somerset WCentretown
471 Somerset WCentretown
509-511 Somerset WCentretown
887 Somerset WDalhousie
105 SpringfieldNew Edinburgh
63 SpruceDalhousie
98 StewartSandy Hill
140 StewartSandy Hill
256 StewartSandy Hill
381 StewartSandy Hill
19 StrathconaGlebe
251 SussexLowertown
327 SussexLowertown
120 TaborEastview
125 TaborEastview
130 TaborEastview
140 TaborEastview
50 ThirdGlebe
111 ThirdGlebe
Tillbury Terrace340 TillburyWestboro
Tillbury Terrace341 TillburyWestboro
Tillbury Terrace346 TillburyWestboro
Tillbury Terrace347 TillburyWestboro
Tillbury Terrace352 TillburyWestboro
Tillbury Terrace358 TillburyWestboro
Tillbury Terrace364 TillburyWestboro
Tillbury Terrace370 TillburyWestboro
Tillbury Terrace376 TillburyWestboro
Carling Court381 TillburyWestboro
Carling Court391 TillburyWestboro
Carling Court401 TillburyWestboro
Carling Court407 TillburyWestboro
Carling Court426 TillburyWestboro
Carling Court432 TillburyWestboro
105 VachonEastview
115 VachonEastview
959 WellingtonHintonburg
963 WellingtonHintonburg
209 WilbrodSandy Hill
305 WilbrodSandy Hill
474 WilbrodSandy Hill
96 WurtembergLowertown
Carling Court1691 CarlingWestboro
Carling Court1695 CarlingWestboro
Carling Court1699 CarlingWestboro
Carling Court1703 CarlingWestboro
649 ColeWestboro
Carling Court737 ColeWestboro
Carling Court745 ColeWestboro
690 ColeWestboro
Carling Court748 ColeWestboro
371 ChurchillWestboro
381 ChurchillWestboro
449 ChurchillWestboro
451 ChurchillWestboro
463 ChurchillWestboro
533 ChurchillWestboro
557 ChurchillWestboro
673 ChurchillWestboro
683 ChurchillWestboro
715 ChurchillWestboro
408 ChurchillWestboro
472 ChurchillWestboro
706 ChurchillWestboro
710 ChurchillWestboro
Irene Crescent277 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent283 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent289 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent305 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent313 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent321 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent683 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent691 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent284 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent306 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent314 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent322 IreneWestboro
Irene Crescent682 IreneWestboro
Carling Court724 MelbourneWestboro
Carling Court721 RooseveltWestboro
Carling Court727 RooseveltWestboro
Carling Court732 RooseveltWestboro
Saxony Apartments177 Macy Westboro
Saxony Apartments182 MacyWestboro
Saxony Apartments183 MacyWestboro
Saxony Apartments188 MacyWestboro
Saxony Apartments189 MacyWestboro
Saxony Apartments194 MacyWestboro
Saxony Apartments195 MacyWestboro
Alvin Heights1090 BlasdellManor Park
Alvin Heights1094 BlasdellManor Park
245 AlfredEastview
120 AliceEastview
Alvin Heights235 AlvinManor Park
Alvin Heights239 AlvinManor Park
501 AthloneWestboro
508 AthloneWestboro
512 AthloneWestboro
8 AylmerOld Ottawa South
170 BreezehillHintonburg
310 BreezehillDalhousie
314 BreezehillDalhousie
318 BreezehillDalhousie
16 BullmanHintonburg
7 BullockOld Ottawa South
282 ByronWestboro
288 ByronWestboro
Byron Estates890 ByronLaurentian View
Lockhart Estates1012 ByronLaurentian View
5 CharlevoixEastview
154-156 DagmarEastview
54 CentennialOld Ottawa South
196 DonaldOverbrook
200 DonaldOverbrook
8 DrivewayCentretown
94 DrivewayCentretown
104 DrivewayCentretown
108 DrivewayCentretown
550 DrivewayGlebe
554 DrivewayGlebe
611 DucharmeEastview
615 DucharmeEastview
280 DucharmeEastview
286 DucharmeEastview
Eastwood Park3 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park4 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park5 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park6 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park7 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park8 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park9 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park10 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park11 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park12 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park14 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park15 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park16 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park17 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park18 Eastwood PlaceEastview
Eastwood Park19 Eastwood PlaceEastview
164 EthelEastview
114 ForwardHintonburg
124 ForwardHintonburg
520 HilsonWestboro
177 HopewellOld Ottawa South
Lockhart Estates2123 HoneywellLaurentian View
Lockhart Estates2129 HoneywellLaurentian View
220 IonaWestboro
32 IrvingHintonburg
36 IrvingHintonburg
33 DeschampsEastview
51 DeschampsEastview
143 DeschampsEastview
147 DeschampsEastview
165 DeschampsEastview
8 King GeorgeOverbrook
184 LavalEastview
161 LavergneEastview
195 LavergneEastview
9 Lenore PlEastview
15 Lenore PlEastview
20 Lenore PlEastview
24 Lenore PlEastview
351 LevisEastview
Lockhart Estates117 LockhartLaurentian View
Lockhart Estates121 LockhartLaurentian View
Alvin Heights354 London TerraceManor Park
Alvin Heights358 London TerraceManor Park
44 LoyerEastview
149 MarquetteEastview
155 MarquetteEastview
Alvin Heights301 Mart CircleManor Park
Alvin Heights303 Mart CircleManor Park
375 MayfairWellington West
Eastwood Park331 McArthurEastview
Eastwood Park335 McArthurEastview
Eastwood Park339 McArthurEastview
296 McArthurEastview
29 MelgundGlebe
276 Montreal RoadEastview
278 Montreal RoadEastview
280 Montreal RoadEastview
380 Montreal RoadEastview
382 Montreal RoadEastview
384 Montreal RoadEastview
390 Montreal RoadEastview
33 PattersonGlebe
Alvin Heights1010 PeelManor Park
Alvin Heights1024 PeelManor Park
Alvin Heights1045 PeelManor Park
Alvin Heights1049 PeelManor Park
411 Pie XIIEastview
338 Pleasant ParkAlta-Vista
12 RaymondDalhousie
Byron Estates542 RedwoodLaurentian View
Byron Estates550 RedwoodLaurentian View
Byron Estates560 RedwoodLaurentian View
Byron Estates568 RedwoodLaurentian View
329 RichelieuEastview
322 RichelieuEastview
285A RichmondWestboro
54 Rideau TerraceNew Edinburgh
56 Rideau TerraceNew Edinburgh
62 Rideau TerraceNew Edinburgh
234 Rideau TerraceNew Edinburgh
236 Rideau TerraceNew Edinburgh
65 RiverdaleOld Ottawa South
965 RiversideOverbrook
1123 RiversideOverbrook
1089 RiversideOverbrook
65 RobertCentretown
114 Ste-CecileEastview
71 St-CharlesEastview
66 St-CharlesEastview
255 St-DenisEastview
271 St-JacquesEastview
Alvin Heights287 St. LaurentManor Park
Alvin Heights291 St. LaurentManor Park
969 St. LaurentCummings
321 ShakespeareEastview
260 ShakespeareEastview
Byron Estates455 SherbourneLaurentian View
Byron Estates463 SherbourneLaurentian View
Byron Estates471 SherbourneLaurentian View
Byron Estates483 SherbourneLaurentian View
1176 ShillingtonCarlington
1186 ShillingtonCarlington
62 SpringfieldNew Edinburgh
65 SweetlandSandy Hill
67 SweetlandSandy Hill
16 SweetlandSandy Hill
48 SweetlandSandy Hill
58 SweetlandSandy Hill
43 TempletonSandy Hill
1276 ThamesCarlington
Thames Court1290 ThamesCarlington
Thames Court1292 ThamesCarlington
Thames Court1294 ThamesCarlington
97 VachonEastview
1182 WellingtonHintonburg
546 WellingtonDalhousie
Alvin Heights1061 Yule LaneManor Park
Alvin Heights1065 Yule LaneManor Park
Crescent Hill20 ChapleauNew Edinburgh
Crescent Hill21 ChapleauNew Edinburgh
Crescent Hill22 ChapleauNew Edinburgh
Crescent Hill23 ChapleauNew Edinburgh
Crescent Hill24 ChapleauNew Edinburgh
Crescent Hill26 ChapleauNew Edinburgh
Crescent Hill28 ChapleauNew Edinburgh

Rational and Large Scale: Apartment Clusters

The Depression slowed the construction of housing in Canada to something approximating molasses in January and the diversion of both labour and material towards the war effort effectively froze it.26See O.J. Firestone, Residential Real Estate in Canada. Toronto (University of Toronto Press, 1951). Should that not have been enough, Canada’s industrialization had been but relatively recent phenomenon and the construction industry had not yet, in general, come to operate with the same rationalism and efficiency that American builders had. That Canadian builders were in general smaller and less well organized did not escape notice.27Humphrey Carver. Houses for Canadians: A Study of Housing Problems in the Toronto Area (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1948).

With very few exceptions, Canada had not yet seen an example of housing development like the Queensbridge Houses in New York (1939). Source: Google Maps.
With very few exceptions, Canada had not yet seen an example of housing development like the Queensbridge Houses in New York (1939). Source: Google Maps.

In the same way that Levittown changed the scale of – and approach to – the construction of single family homes across the world, so too did the large-scale apartment projects, such as Queensbridge Houses, Riverton Houses, and Parkchester,28Parkchester was, in particular, an attractive model for large-scale apartment construction in Canada. The short-lived Economy Housing of Canada Ltd. was modeled on the approach pioneered by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company for its Parkchester and Riverton Houses projects. See John C. Bacher. Keeping to the Marketplace (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1993): 173-74. constructed in New York by public and private interests alike.29European public housing projects dating back to the 1920s were also highly successful. For most North American authorities, such projects were too closely associated with a socialist ethos to be considered as a model for housing construction.

Shown in this 1938 aerial is the completed development, with the Trafalgar being in place. Source: National Air Photo Library / uOttawa / A6352-37 September 25, 1938.
Shown in this 1938 aerial is the completed development, with the Trafalgar being in place. Source: National Air Photo Library / uOttawa / A6352-37 September 25, 1938.

It would not be correct to suggest that Ottawa’s apartment builders were entirely unaware, uninterested, and incapable of constructing apartment clusters. As I wrote back in March, Wolf Shenkman, who was notably productive during the Depression, developed at Gladstone and Metcalfe what might properly be characterized as Ottawa’s first cluster development of apartment buildings. Located on the site of the old Chamberlin residence, Shenkman constructed six buildings on the 0.94 acre site between 1931 and 1934.

City of Ottawa Archives, CA-035327. November 12, 1955.
Although on a much lower scale than those in New York, the model was repeated in Ottawa during the 1950s. City of Ottawa Archives, CA-035327. November 12, 1955.

Six buildings on a lot just short of an acre is not quite what was needed, nor is it what officials had in mind to solve the housing shortage. Developers would have to think big. Much bigger.

Vanier's Eastwood Park development was just what the doctor ordered: 19 separate buildings on 7.5 acres and freed from the rectilinear grid that was then considered a constraint. Image: Google Maps.
Vanier’s Eastwood Park development was just what the doctor ordered: 19 separate buildings on 7.5 acres and freed from the rectilinear grid that was then considered a constraint. Image: Google Maps.

Cluster Development in Ottawa

Suburban development in Ottawa. As was the case in most of North America, housing moved out to the urban fringe. This map depicts areas built up between 1945 and 1949. Source: Ottawa Journal, August 12, 1949, p. 16.
Suburban development in Ottawa. As was the case in most of North America, housing moved out to the urban fringe. This map depicts areas built up between 1945 and 1949. Source: Ottawa Journal, August 12, 1949, p. 16.

By the mid-1950s, builders in Ottawa had cottoned to the idea and thinking big meant that larger lots had to be secured. For this to happen, developers had to set their sites to the rapidly-growing suburban areas. It wouldn’t come as a surprise that greenfields development came at less of a premium (land prices, often tax and regulatory differences) than the same development would have in the more established parts of town. Because of this, the proportion of apartments that were constructed as part of a cluster development in these neighbourhoods is considerable. In addition to a brief description of the developments, I have provided pie charts that illustrate the proportion of apartments in the neighbourhood that each identified development represents.

Carlington

I’ve decided to begin with Carlington, which was the site of much attention both during the Second World War, and afterwards, in terms of housing. Before the War the neighbourhood, bisected by Merivale Road, was definitively rural on the west and home to J.R. Booth’s sprawling lumber yards on the east. Precious little development took place in the area previously, but in the years following the War it became a particularly attractive location for housing.

Google's definition of Carlington.
Carlington. Source: Google Maps

In 1955, there were two cluster developments identified in Carlington, both to the west of Merivale. The largest one was Robert Campeau’s 23-building Westhaven Apartments, and the second was Thames Court, a much smaller 3 building cluster at Thames and Archibald.

In 1955, it was the Westhaven cluster of walk-up apartments at Coldrey and Kirkwood that made up 77% of the apartments in Carlington.
Westhaven Apartments

The Westhaven Apartments was just the sort of project that both the market and officials were looking for. Comprised of 23 apartment buildings and two duplexes, it was constructed in 1953 by Campeau Construction and officially opened that November. Never one to shy from the spotlight, Public Works Minister Robert Winters attended the official ribbon cutting.30”$1,500,000 Home Project Opened,” Ottawa Citizen, November 18, 1952, p. 12.

Westhaven grand opening. Source: November 18, 1952, p. 12.
Westhaven grand opening. Source: November 18, 1952, p. 12.

It’s clear that Campeau did not intend at this point to get into the business of being a landlord. He put the apartments up for sale in the following year31Ottawa Journal, September 16, 1954, p. 38.. Once the Dominion Mammoth supermarket was completed on the other side of what is now the Queensway, advertisements reflected the proximity and convenience.32Ottawa Journal, October 4, 1954, p. 32.

Westhaven in 1965. Image: geoOttawa.
Westhaven in 1965. Image: geoOttawa.
Westhaven in 2015. Image: Google Maps.
Westhaven in 2015. Image: Google Maps.
Thames Court

I’m not currently certain about who built Thames Court, though the three-building cluster made up 10% of all Carlington’s apartments in 1955.

Thames Court, 1958. Source: geoOttawa.
Thames Court, 1958. Source: geoOttawa.

As is the case with most of these cluster developments, very little has changed in the ensuing years.

Thames Court, 2015. Image: Google Maps.
Thames Court, 2015. Image: Google Maps.

Monthly rents were on point for the time and place ($90-$110), and advertisements most often stressed to proximity to Westgate Mall.33Ottawa Journal, January 12, 1956, p. 35.

The price is right. Source: Ottawa Journal, January 6, 1954, p. 30.
The price is right. Source: Ottawa Journal, January 6, 1954, p. 30.
Eastview (Vanier)

Eastview (Vanier) is probably the most interesting areas of town (and in this case a former municipality) in terms of postwar development. Not only does the Francophone neighbourhood have a load of unique midcentury architecture, but its cluster developments are most interesting.

“For a town which had a $700,000 deficit and very little to recommend itself 10 years ago, Eastview has made a remarkable come-back as a municipality.”34Lorne Manchester. “Eastview Grows Up – Expansion of Ottawa Suburb Attracts New Homes, Industry,” Ottawa Journal, November 13, 1946, p. 7.

In the wake of the Second World War, Eastview was hot. White hot. The Depression had been hard on the small municipality, having the dubious distinction of defaulting on its obligations in 1935 and being placed on the province’s list of so-called “supervised municipalities”.35”Payment Certain By Municipalities Now in Default,” Ottawa Journal, January 24, 1936, p. 15; “Is Hopeful Croll to Straighten Out Difficulties Here,” Ottawa Journal, February 1, 1936, p. 2; Almos Tassonyi. “Education Finance in the Slump: Ontario 1921-1939,” Paper Presented at the CNEH, May 2011. http://www.economichistory.ca/pdfs/cneh2011_tassonyi_02.pdf. As Eastview predominantly served as a working class bedroom community for Ottawa, it is not entirely surprising that it was hit hard by the Depression.36Canada. Royal Commission on Dominion-Provincial Relations, Chapter 7: Municipal Finances, p. 147.

For many reasons Eastview was an attractive proposition in housing. Source: Ottawa Citizen, July 21, 1949, p. 1.
For many reasons Eastview was an attractive proposition in housing. Source: Ottawa Citizen, July 21, 1949, p. 1.

By the end of the War, that horror was becoming a distant memory. Reporting in the Journal, Lorne Manchester described the municipality’s turnaround. Not only was land plentiful in Eastview, but its taxes and other costs were lower, building regulations relaxed compared to Ottawa, and if you were a veteran with a Certificate of Honourable Dischange, the municipality offered building lots for one dollar in a scheme that was reminiscent of the Dominion Lands Act’s tradition. If that was not enough, Eastview merchants, such as Capital Lumber, were well-equipped to supply all the necessary materials to see that as many homes as possible were constructed.37Manchester (1946). In the Citizen, Fred Inglis cast the plucky underdog Eastview as having been overlooked by Ottawa in the 1950 annexation:

“When Ottawa annexed 22,000 acres of Nepean and Gloucester townships in 1950, it took in Westboro, Billings Bridge and Overbrook, but it stuck up its nose at Eastview – although took the area surrounding it.

Ottawa, suffering from growing pains, wanted vacant land on which to expand. It didn’t want any part of a place considered only a blot on the map in 1933 when it had 1,000 of its 4,000 breadwinners on relief. In trouble that year, Eastview asked to be annexed by Ottawa. Now it’s not so sure.”38Fred Inglis. “Community Filled Up With Overflow of Ottawa Firms And Home Seekers,” Ottawa Journal, December 3, 1953, p. 25.

Map of Vanier. Source: Vaniernow.blogspot.ca
Map of Vanier. Source: vaniernow.blogspot.ca

At the end of the War, there remained plenty of development land available in its one square mile, which made larger cluster developments like the Vachon Apartments and Eastwood Park attractive propositions.

Eastview (Vanier) experienced the most dramatic increase in apartment buildings. The single largest expansion was the cluster of walk-ups along Blake Boulevard.

As the pie chart above demonstrates, Eastview’s (Vanier’s) share of apartments located in cluster developments totaled 45%. The single largest project in 1955 was Eastwood Park, which was constructed by Doug O’Connell in 1954 for about $2,000,000.39CITE

Eastwood Park

“Filling up of these 200 new apartments will produce more shoppers for Eastview stores, more people for Eastview churches, more children for Eastview schools, both public and separate and the new high school, all of them close to the new project.”40Fred Inglis. “New Eastview Homes for 210 Families,” Ottawa Citizen, February 12, 1954, p. 20.

As was the case with most of the active builders of apartment clusters, Douglas O’Connell was as quick as he was ambitious. The first mention I was able to find in the local papers was in 1951, when he was credited as the general contractor for the Beamish store on Montreal Road in Eastview.41”Another New Modern Beamish Store to Serve,” Ottawa Journal, March 14, 1951, p. 34. He then went on to construct one of the 10-unit apartments at Lenore Place, also in Eastview, a project for which he received a $47,000 loan from the CMHC.42”CMHC Loans Total $6,000,000 in Ottawa For 6-Month Period,” Ottawa Journal, August 5, 1952, p. 3. The pages of both the Citizen and Journal show that O’Connell was quite busy, but more on that in a moment.

Douglas O'Connell's Eastwood Park, 1958. Image: geoOttawa.
Douglas O’Connell’s Eastwood Park, 1958. Image: geoOttawa.

The public was properly introduced to O’Connell’s Eastwood Park Apartments in the winter of 1954. Fred Inglis of the Citizen reported that the first eight buildings would be complete for April or May and that the tenants could expect to pay about $100 per month for a 2-bedroom unit. Once completed, the total cost of the project was supposed to be $2,000,000. As the final project contained 19 very similar buildings, O’Connell planned to give each entrance a unique style. The kitchens selected were a feature, with steel cabinetry, as opposed to the more traditional wood. As a measure of convenience, laundry rooms in the basement were made complete with a rest room.43Inglis (1954).

Eastwood Park Apartments, looking south from the roof of 368 Blake. Image: City of Ottawa Archives, CA035833. December 12, 1955.
Eastwood Park Apartments, looking south from the roof of 368 Blake. Image: City of Ottawa Archives, CA035833. December 12, 1955.
"Housekeeping's A Pleasure." With Eastwood's many features, the amenities intended for women were placed front and centre. Source: Ottawa Journal, April 20, 1954.
“Housekeeping’s A Pleasure.” With Eastwood’s many features, the amenities intended for women were placed front and centre. Source: Ottawa Journal, April 20, 1954.

Although no apartment project in this time (or in subsequent years) failed to feature the amenities that would have been appreciated by “the lady of the house”, O’Connell and his exclusive realtor, Rhodes and Radcliff were careful to put them front-and-centre. As the first buildings were poised to open, ad copy stressed that the amenities made housekeeping “a pleasure.” The Youngstown kitchens were the star of the show,44As a brand-name kitchen system, it was quite a catch. For some fun visuals, see the following two sites. and were equipped with an overhead sink light. The Formica counter tops and enamelled steel cabinets made clean-up a breeze. All together, it made “the kitchen an exciting place to work.”45Ottawa Journal, April 20, 1954, p. 28. Subsequent ad copy became more general, though was quite happy to stress the presence of the Youngstown kitchens. As the apartments became available, rents came in between $92.50 and $98.50 per month.46Ottawa Journal, June 14, 1954, p. 33.

Vanier's Eastwood Park development was just what the doctor ordered: 19 separate buildings on 7.5 acres and freed from the rectilinear grid that was then considered a constraint. Image: Google Maps.
Vanier’s Eastwood Park development was just what the doctor ordered: 19 separate buildings on 7.5 acres and freed from the rectilinear grid that was then considered a constraint. Image: Google Maps.

As was the tradition, O’Connell had not intention of remaining a landlord. In December of 1955, he sold the entire project to an anonymous local group of buyers represented by realtor Bert Katz for $1.5 million.47”$1,500,000 Apartment Deal in Eastview,” Ottawa Journal, December 13, 1955, p. 2. Katz was the president of the Ottawa Real Estate Board at the time. See “Bert Katz Again Heads Ottawa Real Estate Board,” Ottawa Citizen, January 14, 1954, p. 3. O’Connell, for his own part, had a much larger program in mind: commercial and institutional construction.

While O’Connell was occupied with completing Eastwood Park, he was also planning a number of other projects. He was the general contractor on Nepean Township’s fire station in Bells Corners, for example.48”Nepean Fire Hall – Smart! Modern! Equipped to Serve Nepean Township,” Ottawa Journal, October 2, 1954, p. 9. In January of 1954, through Beacon Realty, he secured M. Landreville’s garage on Albert street for $170,000.49”Sales of Apartment Blocks Feature of January Deals,” Ottawa Journal, February 23, 1954, p. 9. With that purchase, O’Connell got into a dispute with Garfield Weston’s Whittingdon Investments, who was constructing the Commonwealth Building next door to what was then a parking lot.50”Battle Over 15-Foot Parking Strip At Excavation Ended By Injunction,” Ottawa Citizen, July 14, 1954, p. 1; “Tresspass Injunction Issued Against Centre Town Builders,” Ottawa Journal, July 15, 1954, p. 16. Later that year, he was the contractor for Cormet Limited’s Doctors’ Building at MacLaren and O’Connor.51”Issue $450,000 Permit for Medical Building,” Ottawa Journal, November 29, 1954, p. 32.

The Beacon Arms (now Capital Hill Hotel) is what O’Connell was up to. It first opened as an Apartment-Hotel in 1956 (seemingly operated or owned by Toronto General Trust), only to re-open the following year as a Hotel. The ad copy for the Hotel re-launch identifies O’Connell as the President, and Lyle Beamish as the vice-president.52”Beacon Arms Hotel A Distinguished Addition to Capital,” Ottawa Citizen, July 31, 1957, p. 22. I will leave O’Connell here for the time being. We will see him again soon, as he came to be entangled in other, much less successful ventures with his brother-in-law, Bertram Witt.

Ad for the Beacon Arms, as an Apartment-Hotel. Source: Ottawa Journal, March 18, 1956, p. 48.
Ad for the Beacon Arms, as an Apartment-Hotel. Source: Ottawa Journal, March 18, 1956, p. 48.
Blakeview Apartments
Eastview Mayor Gordon Lavergne, Sam Blake (then President, Eastview Chamber of Commerce), and William D'Aoust, 1958. Source: Ottawa Journal, March 25, 1958, p. 5.
Eastview Mayor Gordon Lavergne, Sam Blake (then President, Eastview Chamber of Commerce), and contractor William D’Aoust, 1958. Source: Ottawa Journal, March 25, 1958, p. 5.

The man who put the “Blake” in “Blake Boulevard”, Samuel G. Blake was an exceptionally busy builder in the immediate postwar period. According to an article published in the Ottawa Citizen on the announcement of his “Project No. 4” (which included the Blakeview Apartments), Blake was an electrician by trade who entered the building business, working on slimmer margins.53Fred Inglis. “$1,500,000 Housing Project in Eastview,” Ottawa Citizen, January 27, 1950, pp. 1, 12. Before he turned to the street named for him, he had constructed homes in the Champlain Park area of Wellington West and a number of homes and apartments on Dagmar, St. Ambroise, St. Charles, Lynn, and Landry.54Ibid, 12. The Blakeview Apartments were to join Marius Vachon’s ambitious Vachon Apartments project, situated to the east and described below. Inglis stressed in his article that Blake had no connection to them.

Ad for the Blakeview Apartments. Source: Ottawa Journal, August 4, 1950, p. 28.
Ad for the Blakeview Apartments. Source: Ottawa Journal, August 4, 1950, p. 28.

Under “Project No. 4”, there were to be 23 Blakeview Apartments with eight units apiece. The development was a complete greenfield effort, with stress being placed on the the rear placement of utility poles and that the street lights were powered by underground conduit. Moreover, the “attractive new community” was “free from slum areas, commercial enterprises, or industries.” The $65,000 apartments were to rent at $65-$85 per month, placing them in the same range as Vachon’s apartments down the street.55Ibid, 1. As was the case for so much development at the time, preference would be given to veterans.56Ibid, 12.

“Veterans have preference in buying homes or renting apartments in the Blake project but some thought that Mr. Blake was crazy or that they had misunderstood him when he told them that parents with children were preferred in his new apartments.”57Ibid, 12.

Sam Blake was up-front about welcoming families with children into his apartments. Source: Ottawa Citizen, August 2, 1950, p. 17.
Sam Blake was up-front about welcoming families with children into his apartments. Source: Ottawa Citizen, August 2, 1950, p. 17.

So far, it has only been the two Blake Boulevard apartment clusters that I have seen such up-front acceptance and clarity about the topic of children being welcome in the apartments.

Blake's community connections in Eastview were strong, and the opening of the Blakeview Apartments was about as locally star-studded as it could get. Source: Ottawa Citizen, August 9, 1950, p. 19.
Blake’s community connections in Eastview were strong, and the opening of the Blakeview Apartments was about as locally star-studded as it could get. Source: Ottawa Citizen, August 9, 1950, p. 19.

“As revolutionary as tomorrow but as sound as a silver dollar.” J.C. Paradis and Howard Glover of the CMHC attended the grand opening of the Blakeview apartment and expressed great pleasure at the final results. Glover claimed that “this is an example of what the corporation is trying to encourage.”58”Eastview Mayor Opens New Blakeview Apartment Plan,” Ottawa Citizen, August 9, 1950, p.19. Although it is not made specific, it appears to be the case that, like Vachon’s project and the later Riverview Terrace, the Blakeview was completed under the CMHC’s Rental Insurance Plan, as the ads do make mention of the rent ceilings.59Ottawa Citizen, August 17, 1950, p. 30.

1965 Blakeview
Blakeview Apartments, 1965. Image: geoOttawa.

Like most of Eastview’s builders, Sam Blake placed himself at the centre of the municipality’s efforts in boosterism. The rapid pace of development in Eastview was frequently associated with the community’s numerous benefits: largely space to grow, numerous amenities, and – never absent from the lips of the boosters – lower tax rates, a lower cost of building, and even the lower price of public transit.60Eastview Bus Service, until it was taken over by the OTC that December retained its 5c fare. The OTC implemented service improvements through the 1950s, though brought Eastview into its fare structure, which included zones and was 12½ cents (17½ in the far outer zones). See “Lower Taxes, City Facilities – Eastview Happy,” Ottawa Journal, August 25, 1950, p. 11; “Plan Better Bus Service in Eastview,” Ottawa Journal, December 3, 1959, p. 9; “All OTC Zone Fares Except Two Remain Unchanged,” Ottawa Journal, December 29, 1950, p. 1. As labour costs increased through the 1950s, so too did the OTC’s fares. See Ottawa Journal, June 29, 1954, p. 9; “Eastview Annoyed: Higher Fares, Zoning Booms Taxi Trade,” Ottawa Journal, February 2, 1956, p. 3; “OTC To Consider Zone Fares Effect on Eastview,” Ottawa Journal, February 18, 1956, p. 15. In one example of such “native advertising”, the Blakeview served as “an example of the  town’s ‘modern as tomorrow’ trend” and that “town engineers [were] not quite able to keep up with Eastview’s housing projects, but paved streets [weren’t] far behind.”61”Lower Taxes, City Facilities” (1950).

Blake's famous map of Eastview, as published in the Ottawa Journal. Source: Ottawa Journal, August 25, 1950, p. 12.
Blake’s famous map of Eastview, as published in the Ottawa Journal. Source: Ottawa Journal, August 25, 1950, p. 12.

Just an embarrassment of riches that would come to fill the pages of the Journal and the Citizen with regularity during the 1950s. Although all builders were able to make sure their names were associated with Eastview’s runaway success, it seems to be the case that it was Sam Blake at the front of the line.62Fred Inglis. “Community Filled Up With Overflow Of Ottawa Firms And Home Seekers,” Ottawa Citizen, December 3, 1953, p. 25. Indeed, in 1958, he claimed that a pictorial map he had Gerard Sincennes produce nearly a decade previous (above) has “done more to sell Eastview than millions of words” and “did more to convince financiers that Eastview really has something on the ball than could have been done in hours of talking.”63W.M. Arnott. “Builder Blake’s Map of Eastview Resulted in Ultra-Modern Layout,” Ottawa Citizen, May 2, 1958, p. 7.

2015 Blakeview
Blakeview Apartments, 2015. Image: Google Maps.

It seems to be the case that Blake had nowhere to go but down. I lack the details, but by 1959, his marriage had soured considerably and the legal thrust and parry was reproduced in the local papers until his death in Kingtson, Jamaica (where he had been living) in July 1962.64See “Requests Transfer of Blake Shares,” Ottawa Journal, November 24, 1959, p. 36; “Contractor’s Wife Wins Concessions in Ruling,” Ottawa Citizen, March 2, 1961, p. 7; “Gets $125 Weekly In Alimony Suit,” Ottawa Journal, March 4, 1961, p. 3; “Notice to Creditors,” Ottawa Journal, July 21, 1962, p. 24; “May reach compromise in ‘enticement’ lawsuit,” Ottawa Citizen, February 22, 1964, p. 2.

Vachon Apartments
Marius Vachon poses with some of his tenants at a party he threw for them in 1952. Source: Ottawa Citizen, January 2, 1952, p. 12.
Marius Vachon was too shy to make an appearance at the Christmas party he threw for his tenants in 1952. Nevertheless, he gained notice in the community for being a popular landlord who liked having children in his apartments. Source: Ottawa Citizen, January 2, 1952, p. 12.

Development of apartments Eastview’s southern sections around McArthur Avenue was actually kicked off by Marius Vachon and his Morley Investments and Capital Lumber in 1949. Beyond Eastview finding its place in the sun, Vachon’s plan had another Phoenix-like quality. In January 1947, the Capital Lumber plant, which was then located at 255 Montreal Road burnt to the ground thanks to an exhaust fan in one of the kilns. The loss was pegged at $75,000, with a third of it being finished stock.65”Eastview Lumber Plant Gutted In Spectacular $75,000 Fire,” Ottawa Journal, January 20, 1947, p. 24. The estimate for lost product came from the kiln, with a 25,000 foot capacity, being half full at the time of the fire.66”12,000 Feet of Lumber Destroyed By Fire,” Ottawa Journal, May 3, 1947, p. 32. Perhaps Vachon and his staff were inspired by their attendance at the Marian Congres, which was held in Ottawa that year.67Vachon actually closed to plant entirely from June 14 to the 23 so that the employees may “follow all the demonstrations in connection with” it. See Ottawa Journal, June 9, 1947, p. 8. Also see Maureen Ward. “Ottawa Marian Congress, 1947” January 7, 2014. https://sites.google.com/site/mariancongress1947/ Whatever the motivation, Vachon’s proposed construction program was significant.

Vachon's vision was much larger than the eventual delivery. Where 40 buildings were planned, 14 were constructed. Source: Ottawa Journal, September 17, 1949, p. 34.
Vachon’s vision was much larger than the eventual delivery. Where 40 buildings were planned, 14 were constructed. Source: Ottawa Journal, September 17, 1949, p. 34.

40 8-unit buildings in the new Blake Boulevard district. The scheme was to be funded under the CMHC’s Rental Insurance Plan68According to the CMHC, the Rental Insurance Plan was “designed to encourage builders and investors to provide and additional supply of rental accommodation by removing some of the attendant risk. To qualify for a rental insurance contract, the housing units of the project must have an average floor area in excess of 700 square feet and contain an average of 3.5 standard rooms and 1.5 bedrooms. The maximum rent may not exceed $80 per month for a fully-serviced housing unit of 800 square feet; exceptions are allowed in high taxation areas and for fireproof construction, in which cases, the maximum rent may not exceed $84.”See Canada. Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Annual Report to the Minister of Resources and Development for the Year 1950. (Ottawa: CMHC, 1950): 11-12. The idea more specifically was that the CMHC “guarantees to the builders or owners of approved projects, for a period not exceeding 30 years, an annual return of rentals calculated to equal 2 per cent of the owner’s investment in the project.” See Canada. Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Economic Research Department. Housing in Canada: A Factual Summary, April 1949 (Ottawa: CMHC, April 1949): 9-10. According to John Bacher (1993), approximately 19,000 units were constructed under the scheme. and was to cost $2,700,000 in all. Rents were to run from $61 to $91.50 per month and it the first six four-storey cinderblock and stucco buildings were completed in October of 1949. With 125 employed on the project, Vachon speculated that the entire project would be completed by the following spring. The full plan was said to be “one of the largest real estate developments in Ontario.”69”$2,700,000 Housing For Eastview: Will Care For 320 Families,” Ottawa Citizen, July 21, 1949, pp. 1, 14.

1965 Blake
Vachon Apartments, 1965. Image: geoOttawa.

One way in which Vachon’s practice as a landlord was somewhat novel was that like Sam Blake, he was both up-front and explicit that “children will offer no difficulty when seeking accommodation.” He claimed that he “had no intention of barring children from [his] apartments,” that there “are children in the apartments [he] already [owned] and [he would] continue to lease to tenants with families.”70Ibid, p. 14. He even went as far as to throw an annual Christmas party for his tenants, complete with “presents and treats for the youngsters.”71Ben Dworkin. “Landlord Loves Children Throws Two Big Parties,” Ottawa Citizen, January 2, 1952, p. 12.

2015 Blake
Vachon Apartments, 2015. Image: Google Maps.

Unfortunately, what was billed as “one of the largest real estate developments in Ontario”72Ottawa Citizen, September 17, 1949, p. 17. did not quite make it to those dizzying heights, completing only 14 buildings.

Kingsview Gardens

The smallest individual cluster development at this time was Leon Petegorsky’s Kingsview Gardens, constructed in 1950. For what it might have lacked in impressive scope – 12 buildings and 108 units in total on 2.5 acres – it more than made up for in unit size. This is to say nothing of Petegorsky himself: no stranger Eastview or apartment construction. The story of Leon “Pete” Petegorsky is one, as Joe Finn of the Citizen characterized it, that has a “distinctive Horatio Alger flavor. [sic]”73Joe Finn. “Leon Petegorsky Made Rapid Climb Up Ladder,” Ottawa Citizen, August 16, 1952, p. 6. When he was not the Reeve of Eastview or the owner and operator of Eastview Bus Service (which proudly kept fares at a nickel), Petegorsky spent time in property development.74Ibid.; The Eastview Chamber of Commerce launched an expansion campaign during the War and Petegorsky’s bus service was prominent. See Ottawa Journal, August 14, 1943, pp. 21-24; “Eastview Bus Service Sold for ‘$150,000’,” Ottawa Citizen, September 2, 1946, p. 1; Petegorsky was remembered among Eastview’s mayors who laid the foundation for the postwar turnaround. See Joe Finn. “Realty Development Is Now Situated In Area,” Ottawa Citizen, November 7, 1946, p. 22.

Kingsview Gardens. Source: Ottawa Journal, November 25, 1950, p. 8.
Kingsview Gardens. Source: Ottawa Journal, November 25, 1950, p. 8.

Petegorsky had constructed a number of buildings, but perhaps the Beverley Apartments (named after his daughter and designed by the very busy J. Morris Woolfson) at the corner of Chapel and Daly in Sandy Hill was his best known at the time.75Beverley, his daughter, was the wife of Marvin Chodikoff, developer of the Mark Building (which was in turn named after their son) at Cooper and Elgin. Also see “$250,000 Apartment For Sandy Hill,” Ottawa Journal, September 20, 1947, p. 1; “Two New Apartment Buildings Largest Permits for September,” Ottawa Journal, October 10, 1947, p. 26; “Suites to Be Added to Apartment House,” Ottawa Journal, January 3, 1949, p. 14. The remainder of the Kingsview Park neighbourhood, comprised of single family homes had been a project of Clairson Construction, a development arm of Eastview’s Clairson lumber company.76See “Building Homes on River Road,” Ottawa Journal, February 24, 1943, p. 10; “30 New Homes Now Building In Beautiful Kingsview Park by Clarison Construction,” Ottawa Journal, August 14, 1943, p. 24.

1965 Kingsview
1965 Kingsview
The Kingsview Park Apartments, being all large two-bedroom units, were rented at $91 per month. Source: Ottawa Citizen, December 9, 1950, p. 26.
At $91 per month, Kingsview was near the higher end of the local market. Source: Ottawa Citizen, December 9, 1950, p. 26.

The project was announced in January 1950. According to a report in the Journal, Petegorsky described the $1,000,000 project as including “14 two-storey buildings each containing eight apartment units, along the lines of the Mann avenue project.” The project would be serviced by two new streets (Mark Avenue and perhaps a link to Greenway Avenue), and it was hoped that it would “round out the development of the Kingsview Park area.” The contractor for the project was the always-busy Kenneth J. Greene.77”Plan $1,000,000 Housing Project For Eastview,” Ottawa Journal, January 17, 1950, p. 12. The size, price, and quality of the development suggests that the characterization of the project as being along the lines of the Mann Avenue Project was probably not something that was carried out with. It was not for long that the name stuck, although the distinction is not a particularly strong one. In what must be the shortest marketing effort I have seen for a cluster development in this period, the name “Kingsview Garden Apartments” was applied for a mere two days: the two Petegorsky ran advertisements on, December 8 and 9, 1950. Most of the time, the individual buildings were referred to by their municipal address in advertisements and in other examples of reporting.

 

2015 Kingsview
2015 Kingsview

There were a considerable number of apartment cluster developments that continued to appear following the four outlined above. Of note are Millcraft Village (1958) and and Castle Court (1956).

An aerial view of Eastview (Vanier) in 1945. Source: uOttawa / NAPL, Roll A9608, Image 51, October 28, 1945.
An aerial view of Eastview (Vanier) in 1945. Source: uOttawa / NAPL, Roll A9608, Image 51, October 28, 1945.
An aerial view of Eastview (Vanier) in 1965. Source: geoOttawa.
An aerial view of Eastview (Vanier) in 1965. What a difference 20 years make. Source: geoOttawa.
Sandy Hill

From today’s standpoint, Sandy Hill has long been a popular location for the construction of apartment buildings. Home to such builders as Wolf Shenkman and the Petergorskys, it has run behind only Centretown in the total number of the style of housing. In addition to its proximity to the Rideau street commercial district and Byward Market, the neighbourhood has been host to the University of Ottawa since 1856. Originally the estate of Louis Besserer,78Whose house still stands at the corner of King Edward and Daly. the neighbourhood quickly became a haven for the upper income brackets during the late 19th century.79John H. Taylor. Ottawa: An Illustrated History (Toronto: Lorimer, 1984): 84, 94. As Ottawa entered the 1920s and 1930s, Sandy Hill, like Centretown, began to attract a greater proportion of commercial and apartment construction.80Taylor suggests that this was predominantly following the Second World War. Though I’d agree about commercial development, it’s quite clear that apartments had become common long before. See Taylor (1984): 186.

Sandy Hill
Sandy Hill
Strathcona Heights (Mann Avenue Project)

The land at the far southern extent of Sandy Hill, on the southern side of Mann Avenue, had been for decades owned by the Dominion.81I am uncertain at the moment as to the specific date at which the Dominion purchased (or expropriated) the land from either Archibald Stewart or his estate. It may have been around 1925. See “Revives Question of Industrial Site,” Ottawa Journal, January 14, 1925, p. 20; Illustrated Historical Atlas of the County of Carleton, 1879 (Toronto: H. Belden & Co.): Ottawa City. In the years before Strathcona Heights was constructed, a number of projects were envisioned, including the construction of a Dominion Government records storage facility.82”Consider Sites for New Building,” Ottawa Journal, November 26, 1934, p. 18. Following the Second World War, however, it was housing that was understood to be the best and highest use of the property. In 1945, the Canadian Legion’s Social Service Committee suggested using the site for the erection of 30-40 of Wartime Housing Ltd.’s temporary homes.83”Legion Group Asks Action On Sites for Veterans’ Homes,” Ottawa Journal, February 13, 1945, p. 18. In the following year, it was announced that the RCMP was to construct five apartments on the lot for their personnel.84”5 Apartments in Sandy Hill To House 100 RCMP Families,” Ottawa Journal, March 18, 1946, p. 8. In the end, however, neither scheme came to pass.

Illustration run in the Ottawa Journal. Source: Ottawa Journal, January 9, 1947, p. 1.
Illustration run in the Ottawa Journal. Source: Ottawa Journal, January 9, 1947, p. 1.

The significant project would comprise 25% of all apartment buildings in the Sandy Hill neighbourhood in 1955.

Sandy Hill remained a popular location. The CMHC’s Strathcona Heights development represented the single largest increase.

Strathcona Heights,85It was renamed “Strathcona Heights” in 1950 at the request of the Mann Avenue Community Council, a group of residents formed the previous fall. See “Community Council Being Formed at Mann Avenue,” Ottawa Journal, September 26, 1949, p. 21; “Mann Avenue Project Now Becomes Strathcona Heights,” Ottawa Journal, November 8, 1950, p. 1. or the Mann Avenue housing project as it was called at first, was originally an initiative of Housing Enterprises of Canada (HEL), a development company owned and operated by a consortium of Canadian insurance companies.86Cassie Doyle. Municipal Housing Initiatives in Housing 1900-1970, City of Ottawa. Ottawa: City of Ottawa Non-Profit Housing Corporation, 1982; John Sewell. The Shape of the City: Toronto Struggles with Modern Planning (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993): 72; “Life Insurance Companies Aim to Enter Housing Field,” The Globe and Mail, September 13, 1945, p. 18; “Housing Finance Companies Proposed by Insurance Firms,” Ottawa Journal, September 12, 1945, p. 12; “Mann Avenue Site Selected For Big Ottawa Housing Project,” Ottawa Journal, January 9, 1947, pp. 1, 15; “FDC Approves Housing Project,” Ottawa Journal, February 14, 1947, p. 1. As alluded to above, the inspiration for Housing Enterprises’ approach to develop rental properties was Metropolitan Life’s projects in New York.87Bacher (1993), 173-174. While the entirety of the housing market was in a state of acute shortage, preference was given to veterans in the project.88”Mann Avenue Selected For Housing Project,” Ottawa Citizen, January 9, 1947, p. 3; “Mann Avenue Site Selected For Big Ottawa Housing Project,” Ottawa Journal, January 9, 1947, p. 15. Perhaps most interesting is that the Journal was quite supportive of the housing initiative itself, but was disappointed in the chosen site, as it would not also contribute to the clearance of slums.89”The Mann Avenue Scheme,” Ottawa Journal, January 14, 1947, p. 4.

CTA f2028_it0002n
Regent Park North, 1950s. City of Toronto Archives, Housing Authority Toronto Fonds (2028),  Series 1333, Item No. 2 “Aerial View of Regent Park North.” 195?.

Although there were 32 Housing Enterprises projects in total in locations across Canada, Toronto’s Regent Park North (completed in 1947) was probably the most famous project.90The long and winding road from the 1934 Bruce Report to the construction of Regent Park North is such that the project was more a public housing project than the sort of limited dividend HEL project originally envisioned. See Jamie Bradburn. “Historicist: Moving into Regent Park,” Torontoisthttp://torontoist.com/2013/09/historicist-moving-into-regent-park/; John Sewell. The Shape of the City: Toronto Struggles with Modern Planning (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993): 67-74.

Strathcona Heights in 1984, before the 1989 restoration project. Source: Ottawa. City of Ottawa. City Living Developments. Ottawa: City Living Ottawa, 1984, p. 15.
Strathcona Heights in 1984, before the 1989 restoration project. Source: Ottawa. City of Ottawa. City Living Developments. Ottawa: City Living Ottawa, 1984, p. 15.

By the spring of 1947, it had become increasingly clear to Housing Enterprises that, under their business model, it was simply not possible to deliver housing at the price both needed and demanded. Because of this, the company wound up and transferred all assets and projects to the CMHC that summer.91Housing Enterprises of Canada Limited was transferred from the consortium to the CMHC’s portfolio during the summer of 1947. According to the CMHC’s 1947 Annual Report, “early in 1947 it became apparent that Housing Enterprises of Canada Ltd. could not produce a desirable type of housing at the cost levels originally contemplated.” See Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Annual Report to the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply for the Year 1947 (Ottawa: Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, 1947): 10. Also See “Central Mortgage to Control Housing Enterprises Ltd.” Ottawa Journal, August 5, 1947, p. 3. For the Mann Avenue Project, Housing Enterprises had only drawn up the plans, but not yet procured the materials or labour. Although the project was cancelled just before the transition, civic officials petitioned federal authorities to resume the project.92”Mr. King Writes Mayor Lewis On Ottawa Housing,” Ottawa Journal, June 4, 1947, p. 3. When the CMHC took the project over, it largely retained HEL’s plans and delivered on the design. The project was completed in 1948 and contained 404 units in 52 (largely identical) 3-storey walk-up apartment buildings.93”Mann Avenue Housing Will Begin At Once,” Ottawa Citizen, August 5, 1947, p. 11; “CMHC Negotiating to Erect New Homes in Valley Towns, Ottawa Journal, June 14, 1949, p. 23; “Move in 21 Families at Mann Ave. Project,” Ottawa Journal, June 3, 1948, p. 1; “307 Ottawa Families to Get Mann Avenue Apartments,” Ottawa Journal, September 13, 1948, p. 2.

Undeveloped Crown land on the south side of Mann Avenue, 1928. Source: uOttawa / NAPL / geoOttawa.
Undeveloped Crown land on the south side of Mann Avenue, 1928. Source: uOttawa / NAPL / geoOttawa.
Strathcona Heights 1965
The completed Strathcona Heights housing project in 1965. Source: geoOttawa.

By the 1980s, in part due to mortgages being paid off and in part efforts to get out of the operation of affordable housing projects, the CMHC sold or otherwise transferred a number of projects to municipalities, non-profit organizations, and other private interests. Strathcona Heights was sold to the City of Ottawa Non-Profit Housing Corporation in 1982 and, as it had become clear that the housing stock was both in relatively poor condition and incapable of serving its clientele, an ambitious renovation and replacement program was undertaken in phases, beginning in 1989.94Canada. CMHC. Repair, Retrofit, and Renovation of Strathcona Heights, Ottawa. Ottawa: Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, n.d.; City Living Ottawa. Strathcona Heights: A Community Renewed. Ottawa: City Living Ottawa, 1994; Barry Padolsky. Strathcona Heights: Master Plan. Ottawa: City Living Ottawa, 1988.

Strathcona Heights 2015.
Strathcona Heights as it appears today. Source Google Maps, 2015.

The result of the successful rejuvenation has been to bring the project up to modern standards and to increase the number of units from 404 to 583 in total.95City Living Ottawa (1994); Ottawa Community Housing.

Westboro

Originally part of Nepean Township and a Police Village from 1903 until its annexation by Ottawa in 1950, Westboro’s most explosive growth in apartment construction came in the wake of the Second World War.96I did not count any apartments in the 1945 Might’s for the neighbourhood, but 106 in 1955. For much more detailed and interesting histories of the neighbourhood, I’d consult Bruce Elliott’s The City Beyond (1991) and Dave Allston’s collection of articles at The Kitchissippi Museum and in the Kitchissippi Times.

I CAN GO MY OWN WAY.
Westboro.

Like mushrooms after the rain. Apartment buildings began to appear in large numbers in Westboro beginning around 1950. Carling Court (1951-1953), Riverside Terrace (1952), Irene Crescent (1953), Saxony Apartments (1954), and Tillbury Terrace (1954) were all clusters of three-storey six unit apartments constructed during those five years. While numerous other apartment building were constructed in Westboro during those years, two thirds of them were as part of a cluster development.

A full two thirds of Westboro’s apartment buildings in 1955 were constructed as part of a cluster development.
Carling Court Apartments
John Chenier, Jack and Irving Aaron. Source: Ottawa Journal, January 16, 1954, p. 30.
John Chenier, Jack and Irving Aaron. Source: Ottawa Journal, January 16, 1954, p. 30.
L to R: Jack Aaron, John Chenier, Irving Aaron. Source: Ottawa Journal, January 16, 1954, p. 31.
L to R: Jack Aaron, John Chenier, Irving Aaron. Source: Ottawa Journal, January 16, 1954, p. 31.

I’ve written about them briefly before: John P. Chenier, and Jack and Irving Aaron’s Carling Court Apartments is a 17-building development, located at Carling and Cole avenues at the southwest reaches of Westboro. In the two-page advertisement published in both the Journal and the Citizen, the project was characterized as having been a gamble on Chenier’s part. He “began his building program on Carling avenue” with the first four buildings in 1951 and was concerned that the demand would just not be there. The story continues, that not only had Chenier not overestimated the demand for a residence so far away from the city centre, but he could not keep up. Soon, other builders constructed homes in the district and Chenier saw fit to construct 13 more apartments, this time along Cole, Tillbury, and Roosevelt. Chenier’s faith in the west end was “justified” in the Journal and it was “vindicated” in the Citizen. The units were priced at the heart of the market, $85-$110 per month.97”New Carling Court Apartments Fine Addition to West End,” Ottawa Citizen, January 9, 1954, pp. 6-7; Ottawa Journal, January 16, 1954, pp. 30-31.

Carling Court Apartments, 1958. Source: geoOttawa.
Carling Court Apartments, 1958. Source: geoOttawa.

Chenier did not name his development “Carling Court” until he undertook the second phase of his expansion in 1953. The advertisements for the four original buildings along Carling Avenue were not given a name at the outset and only small classified ads were taken out in the local papers.98See for example, Ottawa Journal, June 19, 1952, p. 26. 1952-06-16-CCourt-Ad-Page-26 Chenier’s specific activities weren’t recorded faithfully in the local papers like they were with other builders, but it was once reported that the Aarons’ Sheron Investments constructed the four buildings along Tillbury and Melbourne at a cost of $37,500 each.99191 New Housing Units in April Building Permits,” Ottawa Journal, May 28, 1953, p. 24.

Carling Court, today. One point of interest is that it has retained the name it was given in 1953, rather be rebranded or simply have the name removed. Image: Google Maps.
Carling Court, today. One point of interest is that it has retained the name it was given in 1953, rather be rebranded or simply have the name removed. Image: Google Maps.
Tillbury and Cole, August 2015. Image: Google Maps.
Tillbury and Cole, August 2015. Image: Google Maps.
Riverside Terrace

Had all gone according to plan, it would have been Riverside Terrace that had the distinction of being the first cluster development of apartment buildings in Westboro. In March of 1951, the Journal reported that the CMHC had issued a loan of one million dollars to Riverside Terrace Limited under its rental insurance loan program for the construction of 26 brick veneer cinderblock six-plex apartments just west of Island Park drive.100Charles Lynch. “156 Apartments A Block West of Island Park,” Ottawa Journal, March 15, 1951, p. 1. The project, which was not a popular one among locals (who had just unsuccessfully fought the water tower at the other end of Island Park),101Ainslie Kerr. “On Island Park Drive.. First ‘The Thing’ ..Now ‘This’,” Ottawa Journal, May 2, 1951, p. 3. was stopped in its tracks when the CMHC turned the loan application down due to a recent policy change.102Charles Lynch. “Refuse $1 Million Loan For Island Park Blocks,” Ottawa Journal, May 24, 1951, p. 1. It should not be a surprise that the CMHC, which at the time was still somewhat reluctant to give its full support to apartment construction schemes, was otherwise quite proud to support the construction of single family homes.103Ibid. It should also be unsurprising that the delegation of Island Park homeowners led by John Harcourt was keen to see the land used for individual homes. After all, “homeowners would take great pride in their homes and properties and would strive to keep them up to high standards.”104”Want Private Home Owners Given Chance to Build Where Apartment Planned,” Ottawa Journal, May 30, 1951, p. 3.

Riverside Terrace 1965.
Riverside Terrace in 1965. Image: geoOttawa.

Riverside Terrace, which was later revealed to be a project of local builder Kenneth J. Greene, was not a dead project, however. That November, the City’s Building Committee began to analyze an amended project that was considered to be more acceptable, containing 40 detached homes and 125 apartment units with rents that would start at $55 per month.105”‘Peace’ Council Finds Board Wise and Cool to its Propaganda Drive,” Ottawa Journal, November 21, 1951, p. 13. By the following summer Greene had developed a new plan, this time with 23 brick veneer cinderblock six-plexes totaling 138 units. With a total cost of just above the one million dollars first envisioned, the plan does not appear to have changed dramatically, though was considered acceptable. Construction was expected to be complete in June 1953.106”City Authorizes Building Project,” Ottawa Citizen, August 25, 1952, p. 1. Rents for the project were to be set at $74 to $104.50 per month and Greene was able to finance the project through the CMHC’s Rental Insurance Program.107”$1 Million Apartment Block Permit Issued,” Ottawa Journal, August 26, 1952, p. 3. The Journal’s editorial board came out in support of the project, largely because it would provide housing that was conveniently close to the Dominion Bureau of Statistics’ new office at Tunney’s Pasture and that the buildings would be “set some distance back from Island Park, so that the parkway effect of that beautiful street will not be impaired.”108”Housing on Island Park Drive,” Ottawa Journal, August 28, 1952, p. 6.

Riverside Terrace 2015.
Riverside Terrace 2015.

Unlike most of the cluster apartment developments constructed during the first half of the 1950s, Riverview Terrace was not only the hardest to fight for, but it was also the shortest living. By the mid-1960s, Greene had submitted a proposal to replace the 23 six-plexes with two modern towers: one 24-storey and one 12-storey. Following a battle in front of the Ontario Municipal Board, Greene was given the okay.109”West End Complex To Get OK,” Ottawa Journal, January 26, 1966, p. 33.

Construction began on Riverview Terrace's Replacement, Island Park Towers, in 1966. The complex (which was reduced in size from the original proposal) was designed by Crang and Boake. Source: Ottawa Journal, October 21, 1966, p. 22.
Construction began on Riverview Terrace’s Replacement, Island Park Towers, in 1966. The complex (which was reduced in size from the original proposal) was designed by Crang and Boake. Source: Ottawa Journal, October 21, 1966, p. 22.

Construction began that year and it was completed in early 1968.110Ottawa Journal, May 24, 1968, p. 28. The architects for the project were Toronto’s Crang and Boake, designers of the Air Canada Pavilion at Expo ’67 in Montreal.111”Island Park Towers – 14 Million Dollar Apartment Complex,” Ottawa Journal, October 21, 1966, p. 25; Charles Lynch. “Real Estate: Shopping Centre Starts Soon,” Ottawa Journal, December 10, 1966, p. 29; Crang and Boake produced a variety of styles, though Island Park Towers appears to have been representative of their day-to-day output during the period. For additional, potentially more exciting examples, Robert Moffatt. “A Touch of Wright in Rosedale,” Toronto Modern (September 23, 2010). Also see Rebecca Delvesco. “Architecture and Flight: Air Canada’s Pavilion at Expo ’67,” Semiotics (2003): 266-275; Jason Stocki. “Air Canada Pavilion,” Expo 67 Lounge (August 1, 2006). CBAC

Advertisements for the Island Park Towers characterized them as a “distinguished addition to the modern concept of culture and fine architecture in the National Capital area” and highlighted their proximity to the golf courses across the Champlain bridge.112Ottawa Journal, September 29, 1967, p. 41. Ads for the complex began in 1968 to stress that Greene was behind the Kenson Towers project in Centretown as well, as opposed to just Riverview Terrace. It’s worth your while to take a look at Robert Smythe’s article on the Kenson Towers project.113Ottawa Journal, May 24, 1968, p. 28.

Unlike the others, Riverside Terrace did not last long. Image: Google Maps.
Unlike the others, Riverside Terrace did not last long. Image: Google Maps.

The third Island Park Tower was completed and began renting in 1971.114Ottawa Journal, August 4, 1971, p. 38. I’ve approximated the view from the third tower’s advertisement. 20151971

The third Island Park Tower opened in 1971. Source: Ottawa Journal, August 4, 1971, p. 38.
The third Island Park Tower opened in 1971. Source: Ottawa Journal, August 4, 1971, p. 38.
Tillbury Terrace

It seems to be the case that the “other builders” that J.P. Chenier found to be particularly motivating for his 13-building expansion of Carling Court was none other than Robert Campeau. In February 1952, the Journal announced that Campeau Construction was to start work on a cluster of 11 6-unit apartment buildings at the corner of Carling and Churchill at a total cost of approximately $600,000. It was stated that the buildings would be constructed in the same style as the ones Campeau had already built in Old Ottawa South, on Riverdale at Bank.115”Work on 11 Six-Suite Blocks to Start,” Ottawa Journal, February 13, 1952, p. 30.

Tillbury Terrace in 1958. Image: geoOttawa.

Campeau Construction operated the buildings in the same way that it would the Westhaven Apartments / Terrace on Kirkwood. They were first rented out (on a two-year lease), and subsequently sold. Rents ranged from $82.50 to $100 per month.116Ottawa Journal, June 19, 1952, p. 26; Ottawa Journal, April 11, 1953, p. 33. The speed at which Campeau had been working at the time left civic officials frustrated: the poor condition of Tillbury Avenue’s construction catalyzed a fight at City Council between Alderman Henry and Conroller Tardiff.117”Campeau Firm Roads Draw Blast in Council,” Ottawa Journal, June 16, 1953, p. 3.

Tillbury Terrace, 2015. Image: Google Maps.

It is most likely that by 1955/1956, they were sold to an individual investor, as the development was then Christened Tillbury Terrace.118Ottawa Citizen, June 19, 1956, p. 31; Ottawa Journal, December 1, 1956, p. 46.

The earliest ad specifically mentioning Tillbury Terrace I have been able to locate. Source: Ottawa Citizen, June 19, 1956, p. 31.
The earliest ad specifically mentioning Tillbury Terrace I have been able to locate. Source: Ottawa Citizen, June 19, 1956, p. 31.
Irene Crescent
Beaudoin's Irene Crescent apartments were of the expected design. Image: Google Maps, 2014.
Beaudoin’s Irene Crescent apartments were of the expected design. Image: Google Maps, 2014.
Leopold Beaudoin in 1953. Source: Ottawa Journal, December 19, 1953, p. 37.
Leopold Beaudoin in 1953. Source: Ottawa Journal, December 19, 1953, p. 37.

The cluster of apartments along Irene Crescent, off Churchill Avenue, was the project of then New Edinburgh-based builder Leopold Beaudoin.119”15 Apartment Buildings Going Up in West End,” Ottawa Journal, August 29, 1952, p. 16; Ottawa Journal, May 19, 1953, p. 28; Ottawa Journal, September 29, 1953, p. 32. Although there are 17 buildings present on the site today, there are 13 listed in the 1955 Might’s. It is most likely that the name of the street – Irene – was chosen by Beaudoin himself, being the name of his wife.120Ottawa Journal, February 28, 1974, p. 37. It appears to be the case that Irene Crescent was Beaudoin’s first real foray into the west end. He was an experienced builder whose first project was a triplex on Vaughan street in New Edinburgh in 1943.121”54 New Home Units Being Constructed,” Ottawa Journal, November 3, 1943, p. 22. Through the early 1950s, Beaudoin was quite busy constructing homes122Ottawa Journal, September 11, 1945, p. 18; Ottawa Journal, November 3, 1945, p.22; Ottawa Journal, April 3, 1946, p. 9; Ottawa Journal, August 9, 1946, p. 20; Ottawa Journal, October 7, 1947, p. 26; Ottawa Journal, September 11, 1948, p. 40. and apartments.123Ottawa Journal, May 9, 1950, p. 9; Ottawa Journal, September 15, 1951, p. 32; Ottawa Journal, April 17, 1952, p. 1. He was also ambitious, successfully bidding on much larger contracts for renovations and restorations such large clients as the federal government.124Ottawa Journal, October 2, 1959, p. 21; Ottawa Journal, January 13, 1960, p. 4; Ottawa Journal, October 16, 1961, p. 3. Beaudoin also took on larger commercial and institutional construction projects, like the rebuilding of the LaSalle Hotel on Dalhousie125Ottawa Journal, December 19, 1953, p. 37. and the Knights of Columbus Hall at 212 Murray street.126Ottawa Journal, November 18, 1960, p. 12.

Irene Crescent in 1958. Additional apartments were constructed after 1955. Image: geoOttawa.
Irene Crescent in 1958. Additional apartments were constructed after 1955. Image: geoOttawa.

Much like Robert Campeau, Beaudoin was clearly a builder first and foremost. The apartments at Irene Crescent were first rented out and subsequently sold. The first of the buildings were rented out in June of 1953, with additional buildings opening monthly thereafter.127Ottawa Journal, May 6, 1953, p. 33; Ottawa Journal, May 19, 1953, p. 28; Ottawa Journal, August 1, 1953, p. 32.

Irene Crescent in 2015. Image: Google Maps.
Irene Crescent in 2015. Image: Google Maps.

In September, apartments largely filled, Beaudoin began to sell them off.128Ottawa Journal, September 29, 1953, p. 32. The sale of a number of them was reported in the local papers through 1954 and the summer of 1955.129Ottawa Journal, February 23, 1954, p. 9; Ottawa Journal, April 27, 1954, p. 10; Ottawa Journal, August 31, 1954, p. 4; Ottawa Journal, January 12, 1955, p. 11. In July, Beaudoin handed off the sale of the final six buildings to Sam Macy.130Ottawa Journal, July 29, 1955, p. 26.

Saxony Apartments
It's not from the seven constructed in 1954, but rather the Macy Apartment that completed the development project in 1956. June 11, 1956. Source: City of Ottawa Archives, Item CA038955.
It’s not from the seven constructed in 1954, but rather the Macy Apartment that completed the development project in 1956. June 11, 1956. Source: City of Ottawa Archives, Item CA038955.

 

Sam Macy's Saxony Apartments, 1958. Image: geoOttawa.
Sam Macy’s Saxony Apartments, 1958. Image: geoOttawa.

Samuel G. Macy’s project off Kirkwood Avenue was announced in the winter of 1954. The Journal reported on January 28 that a permit had been issued to Samuel G. Macy, authorizing him “to build seven two-storey apartment block containing six suites each.” The whole project was to cost $273,000 ($39,000 each) and the architect on the project was J. Morris Woolfson.131”Permit Issued For 42 Apartment Suites on Kirkwood,” Ottawa Journal, January 28, 1954, p. 20. Work had commenced on the project by the spring.132”New Construction in Ottawa Likely To Set a Record,” Ottawa Journal, March 19, 1954, p. 30. The project was initially named for the street it was on: Macy’s Boulevard.133Ottawa Journal, August 17, 1954, p. 24.

Sam Macy's Saxony Apartments, 2015. Image: Google Maps.
Sam Macy’s Saxony Apartments, 2015. Image: Google Maps.

The second phase of the project, planned to be a 9-storey 55-unit apartment at the back of the property, was announced in February of 1955. Woolfson was once again retained for the design and it was to come at a cost of $425,000.134”$425,000 Apartment For Kirkwood Avenue,” Ottawa Journal, February 2, 1955 p. 18. The project was lated revised downward, to a 48-unit building of that was both shorter and longer.135”New Ottawa Home Units Total 233,” Ottawa Journal, November 15, 1955, p. 21. Upon its completion, Macy officially gave it its name of Saxony Apartments.136Admittedly, I have taken a liberty here. Advertisements run in the Journal seem to consistently refer to the larger second phase as the Saxony Apartments where I refer to the entire development. Ottawa Journal, October 17, 1956, p. 44.

This particular picture has become somewhat emblematic of Ottawa's suburban development. An OTC bus at the corner of Carling and Broadview, February 17, 1954. City of Ottawa Archives, Item CA003246.
This particular picture has become somewhat emblematic of Ottawa’s suburban development. An OTC bus at the corner of Carling and Broadview, February 17, 1954. City of Ottawa Archives, Item CA003246.
Laurentian View

For the purposes of this story, I have collected the neighbourhoods of Carlingwood, Laurentian View, and McKellar Park. As I note above, I acknowledge that these borders are somewhat arbitrary, but that’s the breakdown that made the most sense to me, given modern CA boundaries in particular.137Defining neighbourhoods is always an exercise in arbitrary definition, so I’m a little less concerned about the specifics in this case. I went with the Westboro Community Association’s definition because it is suggestive that those engaged citizens within its defined boundaries see themselves belonging to the Westboro community. In the period following the War, residents of Highland and McKellar Parks fought hard to oppose the construction of apartments in the district, keeping it the preserve of single family homes.138Numerous local residents strongly opposed the construction of an Ontario Hydro office building on Byron because it might “set a precedent that could be used to give the district apartment houses and gas stations.” See “Hydro Takes Second Thought,” Ottawa Journal, September 22, 1951, p. 6. It seems to be the case that this was a losing battle, however, as in 1952 and 1953, A. Bosclair and E.J. Spincks began apartment construction projects along Byron Avenue.139”CMHC Loans Total $6,000,000 in Ottawa for 6-Month Period,” Ottawa Journal, August 5, 1952, p. 3; “March Building Permits Valued at $3,323,565,” Ottawa Journal, April 30, 1953, p. 14.

GO MY OWN WAY.
Laurentian View.

So far as I can tell, in 1955, Laurentian View (which also included the McKellar and Carlingwood140Also known as Westwood during the 1950s and as the old Honeywell Farm before that. areas) contained no apartments developed outside of a cluster scheme. All of the 14 buildings either part of the Byron Estates (Byron and Sherbourne) or the Lockhart Estates (Byron and Lockhart). There is one additional 6 building cluster, adjacent to Lockhart Estates, now called the Byron West Apartments. They don’t appear to have been completed until after the 1955 data was compiled and have therefore not been included.

Laurentian View.
Laurentian View.

The names and developers of these clusters do not appear to have been published in the local papers and I have not yet had the opportunity to visit the Land Registry for the location. Although it may have been Spincks and Bosclair, I haven’t anything to suggest that it was. It may have also been the case that these lots were part of the Honeywell Farm (ie. Carlingwood) development and constructed by its developer.141Local residents also took issue with the potential for there being apartments at the north and south ends of the Honeywell Farm development and took the developer to the OMB. See “Home Owners Protest Honeywell Plan,” Ottawa Journal, May 20, 1953, p. 33.

Byron Estates at the top right, today's Byron West cluster in the centre, and the Lockhart Estates at the bottom left, 1958. Source: geoOttawa.
Byron Estates at the top right, today’s Byron West cluster in the centre, and the Lockhart Estates at the bottom left, 1958. Source: geoOttawa.

To complicate matters further, in January 1955, advertisements were run for the “Woodroffe” and “West End-Woodroffe” Apartments on Byron Avenue “across from the Waltz Inn“. Since all three clusters are located at the northern extent of the Honeywell Farm development and can all be appreciably understood as having been located “across from the Waltz Inn,” this provides little additional clarity. The rental agent was Rhodes and Radcliff, the exclusive agents for the Honeywell Farm development, so that may be both indicative and inconclusive at the same time.142Ottawa Journal, January 5, 1955, p. 34; Ottawa Journal, February 18, 1955, p. 33.

The Honeywell Farm development promised to deliver big. Source: Ottawa Citizen, January 9, 1953, p. 1.
The Honeywell Farm development promised to deliver big. Source: Ottawa Citizen, January 9, 1953, p. 1.

I will return to these clusters soon in order to sort it all out.

Manor Park

Manor Park was arguably among the first of the master planned postwar suburbs. Situated to the east of Rockcliffe Park and to the north of Beechwood Cemetery, the community was planned by Gloucester Engineer and local planner Norman B. MacRostie143MacRostie submitted the plan on March 17, 1947. See By-Laws of the Council of the Corporation of the City of Ottawa, 1947. By-Law No. 9801, pp. 219-232. on the site of a failed 1911 subdivision of the same name.144The name “Manor Park” was chosen by the subdivision’s speculator, Daniel J. McAnulty for its proximity to the Manor House at Rockcliffe Park. As was the case with so many of the pre-WW1 subdivisions, it was quite easy to purchase land and subdivide it, but much less easy to actually sell the lots. McAnulty subdivided a number of lots around Ottawa during this period, but did not find much success, save for a portion of The Glebe. He left Ottawa in 1913 for greater potential of Montreal and subsequently for Boston. See Ottawa Journal, May 17, 1911, p. 2; Ottawa Journal, May 18, 1911, p. 7; Ottawa Journal, May 19, 1911, p. 7; “Leaving Ottawa,” Ottawa Journal, October 10, 1913, p. 2. When he died at his home in Boston in 1939, the Journal remembered the 56 year old as “one of the first real estate men to realize the value of developing suburban areas.” See. “D.J. McA’Nulty Colourful Realtor Dies in Boston,” Ottawa Journal, March 28, 1939, p. 1. The 1946 plan called primarily for single family homes, with a garden homes, a shopping centre, and school clustered at the southeast corner of the property, St. Laurent and Hemlock.145See “Planning 650 Housing Units in Manor Park,” Ottawa Citizen, December 21, 1956, p.13; “Reach Agreement on $3 Million Housing Plan in Gloucester,” Ottawa Journal, December 24, 1946, p. 17; “Designate Area in Gloucester Residential Site,” Ottawa Journal, March 6, 1947, p. 15; “Manor Park Division Is Approved By Board,” Ottawa Citizen, March 6, 1947, p. 12; “Housing Project Goes Ahead,” Ottawa Journal, March 18, 1947, p. 7;  Thomas H. Turner. “The Fantastic Tale of Manor Park Village – 100 Acres of Natural Beauty,” Ottawa Citizen, October 10, 1947, p. 13; M.A. Seymour. Ottawa Land Enquiry: Report of the Commissioner, M.A. Seymour, Esq., Q.C. 1953. City of Ottawa Archives Accession 2010.0049.1 Box A2010-0431 File 2010.0049.1.1.1.

Rather than relying exclusively on ambulant (Rhodes and Radcliff) real estate agents and a showroom/demonstration house in the yet-undeveloped property, Manor Park Realty partnered up with Frieman's Department Store to mutual benefit. Note that St. Laurent Blvd. is named "Malakoff" in this ad's map. It was at that point known as Mount (or sometimes Mountain or Baseline). This placeholder name may be a playful insertion by the photographer whose shot of a model home is used in the ad. Source: Ottawa Journal, June 14, 1947.
Advertisement for Manor Park.  Source: Ottawa Journal, June 14, 1947, p. 5.
Manor Park
Manor Park

Manor Park is not (and was not) known for its apartments. The popular image of the neighbourhood has been, from its beginning in 1947, of the single family homes that line its curvilinear streets, predominantly on the west side of St. Laurent Boulevard. Development on the east side (known as “Manor Park Extension”), however, was largely completed by A.L. Vineberg’s146”Mayor Wants Probe of Realty Group’s Operations: Fears ‘Monopoly’ Being Sought,” Ottawa Journal, December 16, 1952, p. 21. Montreal-based Alvin Enterprises for his imaginatively named Alvin Heights rental housing project. Most of the units were of the rowhouse form and have not been captured in this study, but for those who preferred and apartment, Alvin constructed 14 6-plexes on Blasdell, Alvin, London Terrace, Mart Circle, Peel, and Yule Lane.

The best-laid plans, as they say. This brochure for the Manor Gardens garden homes shows a much larger extension than was constructed. Source: LAC MG 31-B49 (Samuel Gitterman Fonds) Volume 8, File 30.
The best-laid plans, as they say. This brochure for the Manor Gardens garden homes shows a much larger extension than was constructed. In 1950, the Rockcliffe Air Base was expanded, which is likely what put a halt to that specific plan. Source: LAC MG 31-B49 (Samuel Gitterman Fonds) Volume 8, File 30.

Below is the relatively simple pie chart that breaks down the share. The “other” category is comprised of two small apartments along St. Laurent Boulevard.147287 and 291 St. Laurent.

With two exceptions (287 and 291 St. Laurent), all of the apartment buildings in Manor Park were part of the Alvin Heights development.
Alvin Heights (Six-Plexes)

When Alvin first submitted the 464-unit plans for a housing project of garden homes and apartments to be located on the east side of St. Laurent (considered to be an expansion of Manor Park), they were turned down flat. Officials felt that while they were considered acceptable to Gloucester Township the previous year, they did not meet Ottawa’s fire regulations, which came to apply after the 1950 annexation.148”Still Deadlocked Over Manor Park Housing Project,” Ottawa Journal, May 5, 1950, p. 32. The developer and City remained at odds through a tense May week, with their legal team (led by Warwick Beament, also for Manor Park’s developers) even arguing that not only had the CMHC accepted their proposal, but it had even refused to allow substantial changes, as it would come at a great expense and push the rents out of reach.149”Drop Manor Park Housing Plan When City Hall Stands by Staff,” Ottawa Journal, May 5, 1950, p. 14. It appears to be the case that it was Alvin that blinked and they submitted revised plans, which were accepted by the City.150”Permits Issued for Apartments in Manor Park,” Ottawa Journal, May 12, 1950, p. 1. Alvin Enterprises opened its Manor Park rental office in September 1950 and units in both the row houses and apartments became available weeks later in November.151Ottawa Journal, September 21, 1950, p. 42; Ottawa Journal, November 24, 1950, p. 24.

1965Alvin
Alvin Heights, 1965. The apartments are the smaller box-shaped units. Source: geoOttawa.

Unlike most of these cluster developments, it appears to be the case that most of these fourteen apartments have been since demolished. So far as I can tell, only those on London Terrace remain intact, with most of the Alvin Heights development being substantially replaced. Perhaps a case of changing fashion, or perhaps, as the development did get the reputation feared when first proposed, the quality was not there.152The usual anxieties were expressed through the usual accusations, like Alvin was “attempting to build ‘slums'”, and they were “fire traps.” See “Permits Issued for Apartments in Manor Park,” Ottawa Journal, May 12, 1950, p. 1. For later concerns about building condition, see Don Whitely. “House crumbles, drought blamed,” Ottawa Journal, September 9, 1978, p. 8; Don Whitely. “Repairs to crumbling homes may be delayed until spring,” Ottawa Journal, September 15, 1978, p. 33. Whatever the case may be, the area has experienced considerable replacement and construction. There is comparatively little left of the original building stock.

The two remaining apartments at Alvin Heights. Image: Google Maps, 2014.
The two remaining apartments at Alvin Heights. Image: Google Maps, 2014.
Alvin Heights, 2015. Image: Google Maps.
Alvin Heights, 2015. Image: Google Maps.

Notes   [ + ]

1. Thus continuing the proud tradition of using Excel for projects that it really was not designed for.
2. As this is just the beginning of a very long project, once I have the data that I wish to have, I intend to look at each building in more detail to determine the number of units. For the time being, this is all quite preliminary and contingent on additional information.
3. Defined by Gloucester (N), Bronson (W), Rideau Canal (E), Queensway (S). I plan to later break it down into Centretown “proper”, Golden Triangle, and the eastern portion of Chinatown.
4. Defined by the Ottawa River (N), Bronson (W), Rideau Canal (E), and Laurier (S). This can be broken down to some degree into portions, such as the old Upper Town and Midtown. “Downtown” has been subject to much shifting over the years.
5. Defined by the south side of Rideau (N), Rideau Canal (W), Rideau River (E), and Mann Avenue (S). This will be further divided into Sandy Hill North, Sandy Hill South, and the University of Ottawa.
6. Defined by Ottawa River (N), Rideau Canal/Entry Bay (W), Rideau River (E), north side of Rideau street (S). This will be further divided into The Byward Market, Lowertown West, Lowertown East, and Macdonald Gardens.
7. Defined by Queensway (N), Dow’s Lake (W), Rideau Canal (E & S). This will be further divided into The Glebe and the Glebe Annex (much to my chagrin that west of Bronson didn’t get to create/retain its own identity).
8. Defined by the Rideau Canal (N), Bronson (W), Avenue Road (E), and the Rideau River (S).
9. Defined by Mann Avenue (N), Rideau Canal (W), Rideau River (E), and Avenue Road/Rideau River (S).
10. Defined by the borders of the former City of Vanier.
11. This one’s defined a little fuzzier, but it’s roughly in line with the Dalhousie Community Association. Roughly, Ottawa River (N), O-Train Tracks (W), Bronson (E), and Carling (W). I intend to further divide into something along the lines of LeBreton Flats, Little Italy, Nanny Goat Hill, Chinatown, and Mount Sherwood. This will likely change when it happens though.
12. Defined by Ottawa River (N), Holland Avenue (W), O-Train Tracks (E), and the Queensway (S). This will be further divided into Hintonburg and Mechanicsville.
13. Defined as by Ottawa River (N), Island Park Drive (W), Holland Avenue (E), and the Queensway (S). This one’s also somewhat fuzzy, it did not experience much apartment construction until after the Second World War, so refinements will come later.
14. Defined by the Ottawa River (N), Rideau River (W), Lisgar Road/Maple/Acacia (E), and the north side of Beechwood Avenue (S).
15. Defined by the borders of the former Village of Rockcliffe Park.
16. Defined by the current borders of the Westboro Community Association (plus some), roughly being Island Park to the east, Carling to the south, Denbury to the west, and the Ottawa River to the north.
17. Defined roughly as that area between the Rideau River to the west, Donald St. to the north, St. Laurent to the east, and the Queensway to the south.
18. Laurentian View / McKellar Park. Defined roughly by Woodroffe to the west, Richmond to the north, Denbury to the east, and Carling to the south.
19. Defined roughly by Maitland to the west, Carling to the north, Kingston and Caldwell to the south, and Fisher to the east.
20. Defined roughly by the Sir John A. Macdonald Parkway to the west, Ottawa River to the north, Dominion to the east, and Richmond to the south.
21. Defined by the Aviation Parkway to the east, Hemlock to the south, Birch to the west, and Sandridge to the north.
22. Defined roughly by the unused corridor to the east, Heron to the south, the Rideau River to the east, and Smyth to the north.
23. Defined by the Aviation Parkway to the west, the Queensway to the south, St. Laurent to the west, and Montreal Road to the north.
24. The database above contains 1198 entries. Might’s collected a number of larger-scale developments into single listings and I have broken them out for the purposes of this tabulation.
25. In this case, I did review the 1945 edition of Might’s for apartments listed in the street directory.
26. See O.J. Firestone, Residential Real Estate in Canada. Toronto (University of Toronto Press, 1951).
27. Humphrey Carver. Houses for Canadians: A Study of Housing Problems in the Toronto Area (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1948).
28. Parkchester was, in particular, an attractive model for large-scale apartment construction in Canada. The short-lived Economy Housing of Canada Ltd. was modeled on the approach pioneered by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company for its Parkchester and Riverton Houses projects. See John C. Bacher. Keeping to the Marketplace (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1993): 173-74.
29. European public housing projects dating back to the 1920s were also highly successful. For most North American authorities, such projects were too closely associated with a socialist ethos to be considered as a model for housing construction.
30. ”$1,500,000 Home Project Opened,” Ottawa Citizen, November 18, 1952, p. 12.
31. Ottawa Journal, September 16, 1954, p. 38.
32. Ottawa Journal, October 4, 1954, p. 32.
33. Ottawa Journal, January 12, 1956, p. 35.
34. Lorne Manchester. “Eastview Grows Up – Expansion of Ottawa Suburb Attracts New Homes, Industry,” Ottawa Journal, November 13, 1946, p. 7.
35. ”Payment Certain By Municipalities Now in Default,” Ottawa Journal, January 24, 1936, p. 15; “Is Hopeful Croll to Straighten Out Difficulties Here,” Ottawa Journal, February 1, 1936, p. 2; Almos Tassonyi. “Education Finance in the Slump: Ontario 1921-1939,” Paper Presented at the CNEH, May 2011. http://www.economichistory.ca/pdfs/cneh2011_tassonyi_02.pdf.
36. Canada. Royal Commission on Dominion-Provincial Relations, Chapter 7: Municipal Finances, p. 147.
37. Manchester (1946).
38. Fred Inglis. “Community Filled Up With Overflow of Ottawa Firms And Home Seekers,” Ottawa Journal, December 3, 1953, p. 25.
39. CITE
40. Fred Inglis. “New Eastview Homes for 210 Families,” Ottawa Citizen, February 12, 1954, p. 20.
41. ”Another New Modern Beamish Store to Serve,” Ottawa Journal, March 14, 1951, p. 34.
42. ”CMHC Loans Total $6,000,000 in Ottawa For 6-Month Period,” Ottawa Journal, August 5, 1952, p. 3.
43. Inglis (1954).
44. As a brand-name kitchen system, it was quite a catch. For some fun visuals, see the following two sites.
45. Ottawa Journal, April 20, 1954, p. 28.
46. Ottawa Journal, June 14, 1954, p. 33.
47. ”$1,500,000 Apartment Deal in Eastview,” Ottawa Journal, December 13, 1955, p. 2. Katz was the president of the Ottawa Real Estate Board at the time. See “Bert Katz Again Heads Ottawa Real Estate Board,” Ottawa Citizen, January 14, 1954, p. 3.
48. ”Nepean Fire Hall – Smart! Modern! Equipped to Serve Nepean Township,” Ottawa Journal, October 2, 1954, p. 9.
49. ”Sales of Apartment Blocks Feature of January Deals,” Ottawa Journal, February 23, 1954, p. 9.
50. ”Battle Over 15-Foot Parking Strip At Excavation Ended By Injunction,” Ottawa Citizen, July 14, 1954, p. 1; “Tresspass Injunction Issued Against Centre Town Builders,” Ottawa Journal, July 15, 1954, p. 16.
51. ”Issue $450,000 Permit for Medical Building,” Ottawa Journal, November 29, 1954, p. 32.
52. ”Beacon Arms Hotel A Distinguished Addition to Capital,” Ottawa Citizen, July 31, 1957, p. 22.
53. Fred Inglis. “$1,500,000 Housing Project in Eastview,” Ottawa Citizen, January 27, 1950, pp. 1, 12.
54. Ibid, 12.
55. Ibid, 1.
56. Ibid, 12.
57. Ibid, 12.
58. ”Eastview Mayor Opens New Blakeview Apartment Plan,” Ottawa Citizen, August 9, 1950, p.19.
59. Ottawa Citizen, August 17, 1950, p. 30.
60. Eastview Bus Service, until it was taken over by the OTC that December retained its 5c fare. The OTC implemented service improvements through the 1950s, though brought Eastview into its fare structure, which included zones and was 12½ cents (17½ in the far outer zones). See “Lower Taxes, City Facilities – Eastview Happy,” Ottawa Journal, August 25, 1950, p. 11; “Plan Better Bus Service in Eastview,” Ottawa Journal, December 3, 1959, p. 9; “All OTC Zone Fares Except Two Remain Unchanged,” Ottawa Journal, December 29, 1950, p. 1. As labour costs increased through the 1950s, so too did the OTC’s fares. See Ottawa Journal, June 29, 1954, p. 9; “Eastview Annoyed: Higher Fares, Zoning Booms Taxi Trade,” Ottawa Journal, February 2, 1956, p. 3; “OTC To Consider Zone Fares Effect on Eastview,” Ottawa Journal, February 18, 1956, p. 15.
61. ”Lower Taxes, City Facilities” (1950).
62. Fred Inglis. “Community Filled Up With Overflow Of Ottawa Firms And Home Seekers,” Ottawa Citizen, December 3, 1953, p. 25.
63. W.M. Arnott. “Builder Blake’s Map of Eastview Resulted in Ultra-Modern Layout,” Ottawa Citizen, May 2, 1958, p. 7.
64. See “Requests Transfer of Blake Shares,” Ottawa Journal, November 24, 1959, p. 36; “Contractor’s Wife Wins Concessions in Ruling,” Ottawa Citizen, March 2, 1961, p. 7; “Gets $125 Weekly In Alimony Suit,” Ottawa Journal, March 4, 1961, p. 3; “Notice to Creditors,” Ottawa Journal, July 21, 1962, p. 24; “May reach compromise in ‘enticement’ lawsuit,” Ottawa Citizen, February 22, 1964, p. 2.
65. ”Eastview Lumber Plant Gutted In Spectacular $75,000 Fire,” Ottawa Journal, January 20, 1947, p. 24.
66. ”12,000 Feet of Lumber Destroyed By Fire,” Ottawa Journal, May 3, 1947, p. 32.
67. Vachon actually closed to plant entirely from June 14 to the 23 so that the employees may “follow all the demonstrations in connection with” it. See Ottawa Journal, June 9, 1947, p. 8. Also see Maureen Ward. “Ottawa Marian Congress, 1947” January 7, 2014. https://sites.google.com/site/mariancongress1947/
68. According to the CMHC, the Rental Insurance Plan was “designed to encourage builders and investors to provide and additional supply of rental accommodation by removing some of the attendant risk. To qualify for a rental insurance contract, the housing units of the project must have an average floor area in excess of 700 square feet and contain an average of 3.5 standard rooms and 1.5 bedrooms. The maximum rent may not exceed $80 per month for a fully-serviced housing unit of 800 square feet; exceptions are allowed in high taxation areas and for fireproof construction, in which cases, the maximum rent may not exceed $84.”See Canada. Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Annual Report to the Minister of Resources and Development for the Year 1950. (Ottawa: CMHC, 1950): 11-12. The idea more specifically was that the CMHC “guarantees to the builders or owners of approved projects, for a period not exceeding 30 years, an annual return of rentals calculated to equal 2 per cent of the owner’s investment in the project.” See Canada. Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Economic Research Department. Housing in Canada: A Factual Summary, April 1949 (Ottawa: CMHC, April 1949): 9-10. According to John Bacher (1993), approximately 19,000 units were constructed under the scheme.
69. ”$2,700,000 Housing For Eastview: Will Care For 320 Families,” Ottawa Citizen, July 21, 1949, pp. 1, 14.
70. Ibid, p. 14.
71. Ben Dworkin. “Landlord Loves Children Throws Two Big Parties,” Ottawa Citizen, January 2, 1952, p. 12.
72. Ottawa Citizen, September 17, 1949, p. 17.
73. Joe Finn. “Leon Petegorsky Made Rapid Climb Up Ladder,” Ottawa Citizen, August 16, 1952, p. 6.
74. Ibid.; The Eastview Chamber of Commerce launched an expansion campaign during the War and Petegorsky’s bus service was prominent. See Ottawa Journal, August 14, 1943, pp. 21-24; “Eastview Bus Service Sold for ‘$150,000’,” Ottawa Citizen, September 2, 1946, p. 1; Petegorsky was remembered among Eastview’s mayors who laid the foundation for the postwar turnaround. See Joe Finn. “Realty Development Is Now Situated In Area,” Ottawa Citizen, November 7, 1946, p. 22.
75. Beverley, his daughter, was the wife of Marvin Chodikoff, developer of the Mark Building (which was in turn named after their son) at Cooper and Elgin. Also see “$250,000 Apartment For Sandy Hill,” Ottawa Journal, September 20, 1947, p. 1; “Two New Apartment Buildings Largest Permits for September,” Ottawa Journal, October 10, 1947, p. 26; “Suites to Be Added to Apartment House,” Ottawa Journal, January 3, 1949, p. 14.
76. See “Building Homes on River Road,” Ottawa Journal, February 24, 1943, p. 10; “30 New Homes Now Building In Beautiful Kingsview Park by Clarison Construction,” Ottawa Journal, August 14, 1943, p. 24.
77. ”Plan $1,000,000 Housing Project For Eastview,” Ottawa Journal, January 17, 1950, p. 12.
78. Whose house still stands at the corner of King Edward and Daly.
79. John H. Taylor. Ottawa: An Illustrated History (Toronto: Lorimer, 1984): 84, 94.
80. Taylor suggests that this was predominantly following the Second World War. Though I’d agree about commercial development, it’s quite clear that apartments had become common long before. See Taylor (1984): 186.
81. I am uncertain at the moment as to the specific date at which the Dominion purchased (or expropriated) the land from either Archibald Stewart or his estate. It may have been around 1925. See “Revives Question of Industrial Site,” Ottawa Journal, January 14, 1925, p. 20; Illustrated Historical Atlas of the County of Carleton, 1879 (Toronto: H. Belden & Co.): Ottawa City.
82. ”Consider Sites for New Building,” Ottawa Journal, November 26, 1934, p. 18.
83. ”Legion Group Asks Action On Sites for Veterans’ Homes,” Ottawa Journal, February 13, 1945, p. 18.
84. ”5 Apartments in Sandy Hill To House 100 RCMP Families,” Ottawa Journal, March 18, 1946, p. 8.
85. It was renamed “Strathcona Heights” in 1950 at the request of the Mann Avenue Community Council, a group of residents formed the previous fall. See “Community Council Being Formed at Mann Avenue,” Ottawa Journal, September 26, 1949, p. 21; “Mann Avenue Project Now Becomes Strathcona Heights,” Ottawa Journal, November 8, 1950, p. 1.
86. Cassie Doyle. Municipal Housing Initiatives in Housing 1900-1970, City of Ottawa. Ottawa: City of Ottawa Non-Profit Housing Corporation, 1982; John Sewell. The Shape of the City: Toronto Struggles with Modern Planning (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993): 72; “Life Insurance Companies Aim to Enter Housing Field,” The Globe and Mail, September 13, 1945, p. 18; “Housing Finance Companies Proposed by Insurance Firms,” Ottawa Journal, September 12, 1945, p. 12; “Mann Avenue Site Selected For Big Ottawa Housing Project,” Ottawa Journal, January 9, 1947, pp. 1, 15; “FDC Approves Housing Project,” Ottawa Journal, February 14, 1947, p. 1.
87. Bacher (1993), 173-174.
88. ”Mann Avenue Selected For Housing Project,” Ottawa Citizen, January 9, 1947, p. 3; “Mann Avenue Site Selected For Big Ottawa Housing Project,” Ottawa Journal, January 9, 1947, p. 15.
89. ”The Mann Avenue Scheme,” Ottawa Journal, January 14, 1947, p. 4.
90. The long and winding road from the 1934 Bruce Report to the construction of Regent Park North is such that the project was more a public housing project than the sort of limited dividend HEL project originally envisioned. See Jamie Bradburn. “Historicist: Moving into Regent Park,” Torontoisthttp://torontoist.com/2013/09/historicist-moving-into-regent-park/; John Sewell. The Shape of the City: Toronto Struggles with Modern Planning (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1993): 67-74.
91. Housing Enterprises of Canada Limited was transferred from the consortium to the CMHC’s portfolio during the summer of 1947. According to the CMHC’s 1947 Annual Report, “early in 1947 it became apparent that Housing Enterprises of Canada Ltd. could not produce a desirable type of housing at the cost levels originally contemplated.” See Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Annual Report to the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply for the Year 1947 (Ottawa: Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, 1947): 10. Also See “Central Mortgage to Control Housing Enterprises Ltd.” Ottawa Journal, August 5, 1947, p. 3.
92. ”Mr. King Writes Mayor Lewis On Ottawa Housing,” Ottawa Journal, June 4, 1947, p. 3.
93. ”Mann Avenue Housing Will Begin At Once,” Ottawa Citizen, August 5, 1947, p. 11; “CMHC Negotiating to Erect New Homes in Valley Towns, Ottawa Journal, June 14, 1949, p. 23; “Move in 21 Families at Mann Ave. Project,” Ottawa Journal, June 3, 1948, p. 1; “307 Ottawa Families to Get Mann Avenue Apartments,” Ottawa Journal, September 13, 1948, p. 2.
94. Canada. CMHC. Repair, Retrofit, and Renovation of Strathcona Heights, Ottawa. Ottawa: Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, n.d.; City Living Ottawa. Strathcona Heights: A Community Renewed. Ottawa: City Living Ottawa, 1994; Barry Padolsky. Strathcona Heights: Master Plan. Ottawa: City Living Ottawa, 1988.
95. City Living Ottawa (1994); Ottawa Community Housing.
96. I did not count any apartments in the 1945 Might’s for the neighbourhood, but 106 in 1955.
97. ”New Carling Court Apartments Fine Addition to West End,” Ottawa Citizen, January 9, 1954, pp. 6-7; Ottawa Journal, January 16, 1954, pp. 30-31.
98. See for example, Ottawa Journal, June 19, 1952, p. 26. 1952-06-16-CCourt-Ad-Page-26
99. 191 New Housing Units in April Building Permits,” Ottawa Journal, May 28, 1953, p. 24.
100. Charles Lynch. “156 Apartments A Block West of Island Park,” Ottawa Journal, March 15, 1951, p. 1.
101. Ainslie Kerr. “On Island Park Drive.. First ‘The Thing’ ..Now ‘This’,” Ottawa Journal, May 2, 1951, p. 3.
102. Charles Lynch. “Refuse $1 Million Loan For Island Park Blocks,” Ottawa Journal, May 24, 1951, p. 1.
103. Ibid.
104. ”Want Private Home Owners Given Chance to Build Where Apartment Planned,” Ottawa Journal, May 30, 1951, p. 3.
105. ”‘Peace’ Council Finds Board Wise and Cool to its Propaganda Drive,” Ottawa Journal, November 21, 1951, p. 13.
106. ”City Authorizes Building Project,” Ottawa Citizen, August 25, 1952, p. 1.
107. ”$1 Million Apartment Block Permit Issued,” Ottawa Journal, August 26, 1952, p. 3.
108. ”Housing on Island Park Drive,” Ottawa Journal, August 28, 1952, p. 6.
109. ”West End Complex To Get OK,” Ottawa Journal, January 26, 1966, p. 33.
110. Ottawa Journal, May 24, 1968, p. 28.
111. ”Island Park Towers – 14 Million Dollar Apartment Complex,” Ottawa Journal, October 21, 1966, p. 25; Charles Lynch. “Real Estate: Shopping Centre Starts Soon,” Ottawa Journal, December 10, 1966, p. 29; Crang and Boake produced a variety of styles, though Island Park Towers appears to have been representative of their day-to-day output during the period. For additional, potentially more exciting examples, Robert Moffatt. “A Touch of Wright in Rosedale,” Toronto Modern (September 23, 2010). Also see Rebecca Delvesco. “Architecture and Flight: Air Canada’s Pavilion at Expo ’67,” Semiotics (2003): 266-275; Jason Stocki. “Air Canada Pavilion,” Expo 67 Lounge (August 1, 2006). CBAC
112. Ottawa Journal, September 29, 1967, p. 41.
113. Ottawa Journal, May 24, 1968, p. 28.
114. Ottawa Journal, August 4, 1971, p. 38. I’ve approximated the view from the third tower’s advertisement. 20151971
115. ”Work on 11 Six-Suite Blocks to Start,” Ottawa Journal, February 13, 1952, p. 30.
116. Ottawa Journal, June 19, 1952, p. 26; Ottawa Journal, April 11, 1953, p. 33.
117. ”Campeau Firm Roads Draw Blast in Council,” Ottawa Journal, June 16, 1953, p. 3.
118. Ottawa Citizen, June 19, 1956, p. 31; Ottawa Journal, December 1, 1956, p. 46.
119. ”15 Apartment Buildings Going Up in West End,” Ottawa Journal, August 29, 1952, p. 16; Ottawa Journal, May 19, 1953, p. 28; Ottawa Journal, September 29, 1953, p. 32.
120. Ottawa Journal, February 28, 1974, p. 37.
121. ”54 New Home Units Being Constructed,” Ottawa Journal, November 3, 1943, p. 22.
122. Ottawa Journal, September 11, 1945, p. 18; Ottawa Journal, November 3, 1945, p.22; Ottawa Journal, April 3, 1946, p. 9; Ottawa Journal, August 9, 1946, p. 20; Ottawa Journal, October 7, 1947, p. 26; Ottawa Journal, September 11, 1948, p. 40.
123. Ottawa Journal, May 9, 1950, p. 9; Ottawa Journal, September 15, 1951, p. 32; Ottawa Journal, April 17, 1952, p. 1.
124. Ottawa Journal, October 2, 1959, p. 21; Ottawa Journal, January 13, 1960, p. 4; Ottawa Journal, October 16, 1961, p. 3.
125. Ottawa Journal, December 19, 1953, p. 37.
126. Ottawa Journal, November 18, 1960, p. 12.
127. Ottawa Journal, May 6, 1953, p. 33; Ottawa Journal, May 19, 1953, p. 28; Ottawa Journal, August 1, 1953, p. 32.
128. Ottawa Journal, September 29, 1953, p. 32.
129. Ottawa Journal, February 23, 1954, p. 9; Ottawa Journal, April 27, 1954, p. 10; Ottawa Journal, August 31, 1954, p. 4; Ottawa Journal, January 12, 1955, p. 11.
130. Ottawa Journal, July 29, 1955, p. 26.
131. ”Permit Issued For 42 Apartment Suites on Kirkwood,” Ottawa Journal, January 28, 1954, p. 20.
132. ”New Construction in Ottawa Likely To Set a Record,” Ottawa Journal, March 19, 1954, p. 30.
133. Ottawa Journal, August 17, 1954, p. 24.
134. ”$425,000 Apartment For Kirkwood Avenue,” Ottawa Journal, February 2, 1955 p. 18.
135. ”New Ottawa Home Units Total 233,” Ottawa Journal, November 15, 1955, p. 21.
136. Admittedly, I have taken a liberty here. Advertisements run in the Journal seem to consistently refer to the larger second phase as the Saxony Apartments where I refer to the entire development. Ottawa Journal, October 17, 1956, p. 44.
137. Defining neighbourhoods is always an exercise in arbitrary definition, so I’m a little less concerned about the specifics in this case. I went with the Westboro Community Association’s definition because it is suggestive that those engaged citizens within its defined boundaries see themselves belonging to the Westboro community.
138. Numerous local residents strongly opposed the construction of an Ontario Hydro office building on Byron because it might “set a precedent that could be used to give the district apartment houses and gas stations.” See “Hydro Takes Second Thought,” Ottawa Journal, September 22, 1951, p. 6.
139. ”CMHC Loans Total $6,000,000 in Ottawa for 6-Month Period,” Ottawa Journal, August 5, 1952, p. 3; “March Building Permits Valued at $3,323,565,” Ottawa Journal, April 30, 1953, p. 14.
140. Also known as Westwood during the 1950s and as the old Honeywell Farm before that.
141. Local residents also took issue with the potential for there being apartments at the north and south ends of the Honeywell Farm development and took the developer to the OMB. See “Home Owners Protest Honeywell Plan,” Ottawa Journal, May 20, 1953, p. 33.
142. Ottawa Journal, January 5, 1955, p. 34; Ottawa Journal, February 18, 1955, p. 33.
143. MacRostie submitted the plan on March 17, 1947. See By-Laws of the Council of the Corporation of the City of Ottawa, 1947. By-Law No. 9801, pp. 219-232.
144. The name “Manor Park” was chosen by the subdivision’s speculator, Daniel J. McAnulty for its proximity to the Manor House at Rockcliffe Park. As was the case with so many of the pre-WW1 subdivisions, it was quite easy to purchase land and subdivide it, but much less easy to actually sell the lots. McAnulty subdivided a number of lots around Ottawa during this period, but did not find much success, save for a portion of The Glebe. He left Ottawa in 1913 for greater potential of Montreal and subsequently for Boston. See Ottawa Journal, May 17, 1911, p. 2; Ottawa Journal, May 18, 1911, p. 7; Ottawa Journal, May 19, 1911, p. 7; “Leaving Ottawa,” Ottawa Journal, October 10, 1913, p. 2. When he died at his home in Boston in 1939, the Journal remembered the 56 year old as “one of the first real estate men to realize the value of developing suburban areas.” See. “D.J. McA’Nulty Colourful Realtor Dies in Boston,” Ottawa Journal, March 28, 1939, p. 1.
145. See “Planning 650 Housing Units in Manor Park,” Ottawa Citizen, December 21, 1956, p.13; “Reach Agreement on $3 Million Housing Plan in Gloucester,” Ottawa Journal, December 24, 1946, p. 17; “Designate Area in Gloucester Residential Site,” Ottawa Journal, March 6, 1947, p. 15; “Manor Park Division Is Approved By Board,” Ottawa Citizen, March 6, 1947, p. 12; “Housing Project Goes Ahead,” Ottawa Journal, March 18, 1947, p. 7;  Thomas H. Turner. “The Fantastic Tale of Manor Park Village – 100 Acres of Natural Beauty,” Ottawa Citizen, October 10, 1947, p. 13; M.A. Seymour. Ottawa Land Enquiry: Report of the Commissioner, M.A. Seymour, Esq., Q.C. 1953. City of Ottawa Archives Accession 2010.0049.1 Box A2010-0431 File 2010.0049.1.1.1.
146. ”Mayor Wants Probe of Realty Group’s Operations: Fears ‘Monopoly’ Being Sought,” Ottawa Journal, December 16, 1952, p. 21.
147. 287 and 291 St. Laurent.
148. ”Still Deadlocked Over Manor Park Housing Project,” Ottawa Journal, May 5, 1950, p. 32.
149. ”Drop Manor Park Housing Plan When City Hall Stands by Staff,” Ottawa Journal, May 5, 1950, p. 14.
150. ”Permits Issued for Apartments in Manor Park,” Ottawa Journal, May 12, 1950, p. 1.
151. Ottawa Journal, September 21, 1950, p. 42; Ottawa Journal, November 24, 1950, p. 24.
152. The usual anxieties were expressed through the usual accusations, like Alvin was “attempting to build ‘slums'”, and they were “fire traps.” See “Permits Issued for Apartments in Manor Park,” Ottawa Journal, May 12, 1950, p. 1. For later concerns about building condition, see Don Whitely. “House crumbles, drought blamed,” Ottawa Journal, September 9, 1978, p. 8; Don Whitely. “Repairs to crumbling homes may be delayed until spring,” Ottawa Journal, September 15, 1978, p. 33.

Leave a Reply