Bronson Vines

Bronson Terrace, at present. Image: Google Maps, April 2015.
Bronson Terrace, at present. Image: Google Maps, April 2015.

It’s the consummately ordinary that that tends to grab my attention.

In all its glory, freshly completed. Source: Ted Grant / LAC Series 61-1555 (November 1961).
In all its glory, freshly completed. With the exception of the trees, not much has changed. Source: Ted Grant / LAC Series 61-1555 (November 1961).

Whether I’ve been in line for a show at the Bronson Centre, walked by, or have been seated on OC Transpo’s Route 4, this small mid-century apartment building has always caught my eye. I suppose that it’s probably a function of the smart (albeit unchallenging) brick feature above the entranceway.

Like most smaller buildings at this time, there was little in the way of breathless reporting or fanfare. Source: Ottawa Journal, September 19, 1961, p. 27.
Like most smaller buildings at this time, there was little in the way of breathless reporting or fanfare. Even by the standards of 1961, it could not really be considered a “large apartment”. ┬áSource: Ottawa Journal, September 19, 1961, p. 27.
Source: Ottawa Journal, November 18, 1961, p. 27.
Unlike for larger projects, Bronson Terrace’s advertisements tended to be muted. Source: Ottawa Journal, November 18, 1961, p. 27.

The building was constructed during 1961 and was a project of Harry Viner,1Viner, as was the case with so many small apartment investors, had his primary business elsewhere. In this case, he was (at least previous to this venture) the owner and operator of Harry’s Lunch at 765 Albert street. who constructed and owned a number of small apartment buildings in the city, many of which were located in Dalhousie Ward and in Hintonburg. For Bronson Terrace, he hired C.A. Johannsen & Sons to see the project through.

The Capri Apartmetns on Willow, never really entirely appreciated, was also a project of Harry Viner. Source: Ottawa Citizen, October 31, 1963, p. 2.
The Capri Apartmetns on Willow, never really entirely appreciated, was also a project of Harry Viner. Nevertheless, this was the sort of project that the City hoped would become common in Ottawa’s Little Italy. Source: Ottawa Citizen, October 31, 1963, p. 2.

As is so often the case, the building has lead what can be considered to be a quiet life. Reporting has generally not captured much beyond the usual mixture of human experience within.

I’m not certain about the specific date,2It was in City Living Ottawa’s profile before amalgamation. but it was at some point acquired by Ottawa Community Housing, who rents it out today.

 

 

Notes   [ + ]

1. Viner, as was the case with so many small apartment investors, had his primary business elsewhere. In this case, he was (at least previous to this venture) the owner and operator of Harry’s Lunch at 765 Albert street.
2. It was in City Living Ottawa’s profile before amalgamation.

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